HEALTH

CHPA debuts marketing conference

BY DSN STAFF

What keeps marketers up at night? Officials at the Consumer Healthcare Products Association believe that there is so much information out there that the industry needed a marketing conference to sift through the information and, yes, help marketers sleep a bit better at night.

The two-day 2018 CHPA Marketing Conference, set for July 16 and 17 in Philadelphia, is one that organizers said will be filled with education and networking opportunities for OTC marketers looking to figure out how best to activate their target audiences across today’s fractured media landscape. Organizers said that the summer event would give attendees enough time to incorporate new learnings into the coming year’s media plans.

Companies are facing a constantly shifting retail landscape that’s drawing fewer and fewer trips each year from a divergent consumer base with an age range from Gen Z to baby boomers.

“We can help address these issues by continuously educating ourselves and ensuring we utilize all of the resources available to us,” said Jennifer Moyer, vice president of marketing and sales at Clarion Brands and one of the event’s organizers. “People today — of all ages — are engaged in their health and wellness as never before. From wearables and apps to understanding ingredients, people want knowledge, transparency and meaningful information on how to live a better and healthier life.”

Helping consumers, especially younger consumers, identify products that solve their immediate needs is a white-space opportunity for health and wellness, according to John Dowers, president of Wellspring Pharmaceutical. “The key to marketing to millennials is to present content that is ‘authentic’ with elements that are close to them,” he said. “My experience with Gen Zeros is that you need to deliver your message in 8-to-10 seconds in multiple places, and make sure they know what’s in it for them.”

Learning how to activate consumers is only part of the educational offerings that organizers said will be in play at the event. “The July conference will help marketers develop a playbook for the modern day,” said Ben Fishman, director of brand marketing at Emerson Group. “Attendees will take away from this conference the trends and challenges that impact our business, and ideas about how to capitalize on those trends or solve those challenges.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

SPINS enhances nutrition data capacity with FoodFacts

BY Michael Johnsen

SPINS on Monday acquired FoodFacts, a consumer awareness platform for transparency into nutrition data, ingredients, allergens and sensitivities. The acquisition brings to SPINS FoodFacts’ proprietary product health rating system and consumer-facing iOS application.

“From the moment I met the FoodFacts team, I knew their passion and vast collection of assets would accelerate our mission to help consumers live healthier and more vibrant lives,” Tony Olson, CEO of SPINS, said. “Consumers are demanding to know what is in the products they buy, and they lack unbiased, holistic sources for that information. SPINS is rising to that challenge, helping our clients meet and exceed shopper expectations around transparency.”

SPINS will now be able to add FoodFacts’ nutrition data dictionary, algorithms for coding complex intolerances and product health scoring, as well as its consumer profiles, recommendation engines and patents into its portfolio, the Chicago-based data insights company stated.

That will accelerate accessibility of better-for-consumer products in North America, SPINS noted. The insights will provide retailer and brand clients a more in-depth understanding of how their own products are perceived by consumers with in search of improved wellbeing.

“I started FoodFacts Inc. with the idea that our database could provide users with information about the foods they are eating,” Stanley Rak, founder of FoodFacts, said. “With SPINS leading the way, FoodFacts’ mission now has the potential to reach every consumer in North America and beyond.”

Enhanced solutions leveraging these new assets will be available to SPINS clients this spring, the company reported.

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

FDA declares bulk sale of caffeine supplements unlawful

BY Michael Johnsen

The Food and Drug Administration on Friday cracked down on the bulk sale of caffeine supplements direct to consumers. The agency issued new guidance that clarifies that dietary supplements containing pure or highly concentrated caffeine in powder or liquid forms are considered unlawful when sold in bulk quantities directly to consumers.

The guidance, supported by industry, takes effect immediately given the significant public health concern, the agency stated.

“Despite multiple actions against these products in the past, we’ve seen a continued trend of products containing highly concentrated or pure caffeine being marketed directly to consumers as dietary supplements and sold in bulk quantities,” Scott Gottlieb, FDA commissioner, said. “These products are sometimes being used in potentially dangerous ways. For example, teenagers, for a perceived energy kick, sometimes mix dangerously high amounts of super-concentrated caffeine into workout cocktails. The amounts used can too easily become deceptively high because of the super-concentrated forms and bulk packaging in which the caffeine is being sold.

The Council for Responsible Nutrition commended the agency for cracking down on the bulk sale of caffeine supplements. “Extremely concentrated or pure caffeine has no place in the consumer marketplace, and CRN fully supports FDA’s commitment to taking immediate steps to remove products from the marketplace that present public health concerns,” Steve Mister, president and CEO of CRN, said. “Consumers have access to a whole host of dietary supplements and other over-the-counter products that are manufactured with safe amounts of caffeine.

CRN began addressing this issue as many as five years ago when it released its recommended guidelines for caffeine supplements. The association suggested caffeine content from both added caffeine and naturally occurring caffeine combined should be declared in milligrams per serving either in the Supplement Facts Box or in a separate statement elsewhere on the label. In addition, any supplement with total caffeine content of more than 100 mg per serving should provide disclaimer statements alerting consumers that the product is not recommended for use in children, pregnant or nursing women, those with a medical condition, those taking medication or those sensitive to caffeine.

In 2015, CRN updated its guidelines on caffeine supplements to include restraints against the sale and marketing of pure powdered caffeine directly to consumers.

A half cup of a highly concentrated liquid caffeine can contain approximately 2,000 mg of caffeine and just a single teaspoon of a powdered pure caffeine product can contain approximately 3,200 mg of caffeine. This is equivalent to about 20 to 28 cups of coffee, a potentially toxic dose of caffeine, FDA noted. In fact, less than two tablespoons of some formulations of powdered, pure caffeine can be deadly to most adults, while even smaller amounts can be life threatening to children.

Risk of overuse and misuse is high when highly concentrated caffeine is sold in bulk quantities, and consumers are expected to measure a very small, precise recommended serving. Regardless of whether the product contains a warning label, such products present a significant and unreasonable risk of illness or injury to the consumer.

The recommended safe serving of highly concentrated or pure caffeine products is often 200 mg of caffeine, which equates to 1/16 of a teaspoon of pure powder or approximately 2.5 teaspoons of a liquid. Yet, despite these small serving sizes, powdered forms of caffeine are sold in large bags and liquid forms are sold online in bottles that can contain a gallon or more, the agency reported.

This guidance does not affect other types of products that might also contain caffeine, such as prescription or over-the-counter drugs or conventional foods, like traditionally caffeinated beverages.

In 2015 and 2016, the FDA issued warning letters to seven distributors of pure powdered caffeine, with several of the letters citing that the products were dangerous and presented a significant or unreasonable risk of illness or injury to consumers. Since that time, the FDA has continued to see a proliferation of similar products being sold online. The FDA intends to carefully review any dietary supplement products that contain potentially dangerous amounts of caffeine in any form, and the agency will continue to take action when products put consumers at risk.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?