News

Company launches ‘Sneeve’ to capture children’s coughs and sneezes

BY Michael Johnsen

PORT WASHINGTON, N.Y.  – Sneeve on Sunday launched the Sneeve, a soft, stretchy, absorbent little sleeve that kids wear over their arms, shirts, sweaters, sweatshirts or pajamas to catch coughs and sneezes.
 
The Centers for Disease Control recommends coughing and sneezing into the upper sleeve to help stop germs from spreading. Given that kids in the U.S. average about 10 colds a year, that’s a lot of coughing and sneezing into a whole lot of sleeves. the company noted.
 
Each disposable Sneeve will last most kids for a full day, absorbing phlegm and mucus and protecting clothing from becoming a landing pad for germs. An anti‐microbial application kills 99.9% of viruses and bacteria on contact.
 
The bright blue Sneeve fits comfortably on most kids 3 to 8 and reminds them to cough and sneeze into their arms. It resembles the compression sleeves that athletes use. The anti‐microbial application, used in hospitals, is made from citric acid and silver. 
 
The Sneeve, made entirely in the U.S., is available now at TheSneeve.com, and will be available at chain drug stores and other retailers early next year. Price online is $9.99 for a box of 7, with free two-day shipping with the purchase of two boxes or more.
 
 
keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
News

Almost half of practitioners want lower drug prices, but only 3% expect it to happen

BY Michael Johnsen

BOSTON –  Doctors, pharmacists and managed care executives in the U.S. want lower drug prices for patients, greater pharmacy reimbursement, and an expanded focus on patient-centered care. However they were strongly pessimistic about whether these changes will happen, according to new data compiled by InCrowd, a provider of real-time market intelligence to life sciences and healthcare firms. 
 
"The discrepancy between what the industry wants, and what it thinks it will get, is stark," stated Diane Hayes, president InCrowd. "Over half of respondents expected the exact opposite result of what they hoped to get, like wanting lower drug prices, and expecting there would be no change at all."
 
InCrowd asked members of its Crowd of 1.8 million of clinicians, pharmacy staff and managed care providers, about important changes and innovations they wanted to see in the pharmaceutical industry in 2016 – and at the same time, what changes they realistically expected. 
 
Drug price concerns were the overriding theme of the microsurvey, with 45% of respondents wanting lower drug prices for patients. Yet while 34% of respondents said they would like to see better price control and lower prices in 2016, only 3% predicted they would see such changes. 
 
Better pharmacy reimbursement was identified by 13% of respondents as a top issue in 2016, yet over half of respondents who wanted this predicted either no change, or lower reimbursement. Similarly over half of respondents who wanted more patient-oriented care predicted either no change in this dimension, or, in fact, less patient-oriented care. 
 
"The data show how the pharma industry is largely on the same page as consumers and regulatory authorities when it comes to hot-button topics like drug prices, even if the data don't point the way to an immediate resolution," said Hayes. "Sometimes quantifying the size of the challenge is the first step to solving it."
 
The 3-minute microsurvey included 118 respondents – 52 physicians, 59 pharmacists and 7 managed care professionals – fielded in December, 2015 using InCrowd's real-time platform. 
 
 
 
 
keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
News

NCPA finds medsync programs improve both efficiency and patient service

BY Michael Johnsen

ALEXANDRIA, Va.  – A recent survey of National Community Pharmacists Association member pharmacies utilizing NCPA's Simplify My Meds program documented how both patients and pharmacists benefit from medication synchronization programs, or "med sync." 
 
The survey asked several open-ended questions, and respondents overwhelmingly noted that med sync has increased efficiency in their pharmacy and balanced their work flow. Respondents also indicated patients are satisfied because the program means fewer visits to the pharmacy each month, an opportunity to discuss their medications with their pharmacist and more certainty in their refill process.
 
"Med sync programs, such as Simplify My Meds, are critical to achieving greater patient adherence," stated Douglas Hoey, NCPA CEO. "Non-adherence to medication is estimated to cost the health care system as much as $290 billion annually through necessitating costly procedures or hospitalizations that could otherwise have been prevented. Additionally, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has established star ratings measures for Medicare prescription drug plans that are largely dependent on patient adherence," he said. 
 
"Med sync is yet another individualized service independent pharmacies can offer patients to set them apart from their competitors and simultaneously boost adherence ratings. Furthermore, a 2013 study called 'Medication Adherence in America: A National Report Card' found that the leading indicator of patient adherence was their personal relationship with their pharmacist. Med sync programs provide monthly opportunities to grow these critical relationships," Hoey added.
 
NCPA's Simplify My Meds program is utilized by more than 2,600 independent community pharmacies nationwide, either as a standalone platform or in tandem with other technologies. In fact, the survey documented how some community pharmacies utilize a technology vendor service to facilitate their med sync program while relying on SMM for marketing and promoting the med sync service. 
 
Overall, more than 10,000 community pharmacies nationwide provide med sync services.
 
 
keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?