CENTER STORE

Orbit’s new flavor goes icy, cool

BY DSN STAFF

Orbit’s gum just got a whole lot more minty.

The Hackettstown, N.J.-based company, which is part of the Mars Wrigley portfolio of brands, unveiled the latest offering within its line, the Orbit Freeze Mint.

“Gum chewers have come to know Orbit as the go-to brand for that clean mouth feeling,” Steve Johnson, vice president of gum and mints at Mars Wrigley Confectionery, U.S., said. “Orbit Freeze Mint offers the same benefits fans know and love, with an extreme icy burst you need in the moments that count, whether it’s before a big job interview, a first date or after a great meal.”

Containing an icy, cool flavor, this new launch is the brand’s first new innovation since 2016.

Orbit Freeze Mint is available exclusively at Walgreens in 1.10-oz. single packs for one month. It will roll out to additional retailers in the coming months in a singles pack that will retail from $1.09 to $1.59 and a multipack that will retail between $2.59 to $3.39.

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CENTER STORE

Jif brings back its Imagine If, with Jif contest

BY DSN STAFF

Jif in partnership with the Boys and Girls Clubs of America, and actress Hilary Duff, has announced the return of its Imagine If, with Jif contest.

Dedicated to supporting entrepreneurial ideas of kids, the contest provides grants to families and chapters for the opportunity to spread positivity into their communities.

“As a soon-to-be mom of two, I know how important it is to nourish and celebrate the potential of children,” Hilary Duff said. “It’s truly amazing what kids’ imaginations can uncover when we give them the confidence and resources they need to pursue their dreams, both big and small. I am so lucky to be a part of this contest because I’m truly amazed by what this program accomplished in its first year, and can’t wait to see the bright ideas from children across the country again this year.”

Through Oct. 1, families will be able to submit their ideas online and a finalist will be selected based on creativity, originality, project feasibility and alignment with the brand’s mission to empower parents and kids to make the world a better place, the Orville, Ohio-based company said.

“Boys and Girls Clubs offer a place for young people to become who they were meant to be, with opportunities and experiences that can shape a lifetime of success,” Jim Clark, president and CEO of Boys and Girls Clubs of America, said. “The ‘Imagine If, With Jif’ contest aligns perfectly with our mission, by encouraging children to be creative and impactful. We are excited to continue fueling the potential of the next generation by giving them the opportunity to make their dreams reality.”

The public will be able to vote on a winner from Oct. 16 to 19, before the grand prize winner, who will be awarded $15,00, is to be announced. Further information on the program can be found on the Imagine If, with Jif section on the company’s website.

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Purr-fecting the pet aisle key to growing sales

BY Carol Radice

Fur kids, four-legged children, pet parents — how people tend to refer to themselves and their pets is a clear indicator of just how much their role has changed in consumers’ households. Retailers who understand this and tailor their assortments to meet this marketplace shift are doing well against formidable competition, including online merchants, whose statistics show have been gaining momentum each year.

“Over the years, pets have lovingly fought their way from outdoor animals to indoor pets to taking up a majority of our beds,” said Rashell Cooper, director of marketing at Long Beach, Calif.-based Redbarn Pet Products.

Treating them as true members of the family, including paying attention to their health and whereabouts, Cooper said, is a natural progression that is opening up opportunities for pet product vendors. On top of this, she said savvier consumers are willing to do extensive research on products and entire companies before committing to a purchase, and hopefully becoming a lifelong customer.

“Today’s shoppers are looking for transparency from companies who share similar ideologies as their own,” Cooper said. “Product-wise, they’re seeking out natural food and treat options, probiotics to improve their pet’s quality of life, and technological products like GPS trackers or at-home cameras that can ensure their pets are always safe and connected.”

The pet category is big business for the nation’s retailers. According to industry information, sales totaled about $63 billion in 2017 and are growing at a solid 5%-to-7% annual rate. While much of that growth comes from the medical side, industry officials said that traditional pet food, treats and supplies also are expanding.

Joe Toscano, vice president and director of trade and industry relations at St. Louis-based Nestlé Purina Petcare, said that IRI InfoScan data shows that pet care is currently ranked eighth out of 305 supermarket categories, and it’s growing at a rate twice that of the overall center store.

In addition, a Nielsen shopper study found that pet care also has the potential to boost total store traffic, triggering more trips than any other category. “It’s an anchor to center store as the No. 2 reason consumers leave the house to go to the store, and it’s shopped by 75% of U.S. households,” Toscano said.

At the same time, the growth in millennial pet parents and the trend toward humanizing pets have led to an increased demand for high-quality premium pet products. “We’ve seen an interesting transition happen as of late,” Toscano said. “Several large, natural brands went from being sold exclusively through pet specialty into the aisles in grocery and mass stores. To make room, he said some retailers reduced the assortment of some of the strongest-selling grocery and mass brands, the result of which was no significant uplift in new households as a result of these channel jumpers. The most successful retailers, he added, expanded their pet department to accommodate the new brands, capturing increased sales from the trade-up while not losing existing shoppers.

Seizing Opportunity
Steven Yde, vice president of marketing at the NAC division of Sterling, Ill.-based Wahl Clipper, pointed out that pet grooming is a textbook example of a missed opportunity within pet care. “While I can think of a few mass, drug and grocery chains that have taken advantage of pet grooming, others have either not even attempted to do more or have actually de-emphasized the category,” he said.

In contrast, he said those retailers that have taken advantage of the opportunity have seen some tremendous gains in their pet business.
With the economy booming, one would think dog groomers were seeing a huge uptick in business, but more consumers are willing to take on bathing and trimming their pets themselves. Yde said that as millennials come of age and get their own dogs and cats, it has increased their desire to learn how to take care of their pet. While this trend has been increasing among dog owners for a while, their interest is starting to extend to cats. “Our waterless cat shampoo is selling well above expectations as more cat owners are taking on the role of pet groomer,” Yde said.

The critical component of being successful is to emphasize a complete pet-grooming program, he said. On the other hand, those that just dabble in their offerings are having a tough year. “Retailers who have committed to serving the entire pet customers’ needs have really had a great year so far and proven it is possible to compete against online merchants,” Yde said.

Suppliers are expanding offerings to increase consumer interest and build sales and profits. “We know today’s consumer, regardless of age, wants treats they not only feel safe feeding their pet, but provide nutritional benefits at an affordable price,” Cooper said, noting that Redbarn’s new line, Chewy Louie, is the company’s solution for consumers who are looking for treats and chews made with natural, limited ingredients.

“With this launch, we want all pet parents to experience peace of mind, knowing when they treat their dog to Chewy Louie Natural Dog Chews, they’re giving natural ingredients, minimally processed for their dog to safely enjoy,” she said.

Given that the natural and better-for-you trends show no sign of slowing down, officials at Nestlé Purina recently renovated the entire Purina ONE line of dog and cat foods to be natural. Its Beneful and Dog Chow lines also are becoming more premium, offering real meat as the top ingredient, as well as limited formulas and no artificial ingredients. Targeted nutrition formulas, such as Purina ONE Vibrant Maturity 7+ for senior dogs or the company’s new Bella brand formulated for small dogs, present opportunities for trade-up in the aisle as well, Toscano said.

He noted that because wet cat food is a phenomenal basket builder for retailers, Purina offers two popular varieties — Friskies and Fancy Feast. “We continue to innovate with both of these brands, and now offer large variety packs in both,” Toscano said. “Our treat portfolio at Purina is being renovated, as well. You will see most of our dog treats start with real meat, further aligning with the better-for-you trend.”

Destination: Loyalty
Something Cooper said Redbarn always has done, and will continue to do with its Chewy Louie line, is work with its retail partners to design store floor plans with their customers in mind.

“If shoppers are looking for ‘Made in the USA products,’ for example, how can you make it easy for them to find?” she said. “And once in the right area, how can you organize and highlight products that help the customer quickly identify attractive, secondary-selling products?” Her answer: Start by identifying pet products that their target market is seeking.

“Stores not solely dedicated to pet products may have an advantage when it comes to identifying the next-trending products,” Cooper said, noting that pet trends follow closely behind human trends, be it natural ingredients, probiotics or eco-friendly waste bags. “If a grocery store or drug store is devoting more shelf space to natural makeup products, vitamins or sustainable items, they should consider following suit in their pet aisle,” she said.

Officials at Nestlé Purina agree. The company recently launched its Every Ingredient Has a Purpose campaign. Here consumers can find an in-depth explanation of every ingredient in every Purina brand formula, as well as learn about its quality and safety standards, and track back the source of every ingredient in all of Purina’s pet foods.

Beyond this, dedicating the necessary space and assortment also are key to growing sales. Retailers who fail to evolve to meet the needs of various types of pet shoppers can cause a serious blow to overall sales, as the loss of a pet shopper may cause up to a 17% decline in trips to the store, officials at Purina said.

“Retailers should be looking to merchandise the pet category in ways that accentuate key trends in pet, i.e., calling out natural segments and highlighting innovation in aisle and on endcaps,” Toscano said.

“Showing shoppers that you care about their pets by having a permanent pet endcap, a wide variety of pet items to choose from, and weekly promotions will stimulate loyalty,” he said. “It’s also important to offer a seamless in-store and online experience, focusing on assortment and fulfillment, as e-commerce is poised for strong growth within pet.”

Yde sees more drug chains growing incremental sales because they have created what he termed a “legitimate destination.” In a move away from linear merchandising, more retailers are making it easier for customers to shop the aisle by highlighting food, treats, toys and grooming products in separate sections within the aisle,” he said.

It is critical, however, that the products retailers offer work efficiently and safely, which sounds like common sense but is not always followed.

As some in the industry pointed out, the move toward offering more private-label tools, shampoos and other items has traded the customer down, noting that many of these items fitting that description sell for less than $5.

“That is a shame,” Yde said. “Consumers are willing to step up and pay more for products they feel resonate with the features and qualities they are looking for. For instance, pet shampoo easily sells at $6 to $7. Grooming tools could see the same uptick if retailers would opt for branded product.”

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