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Bay Area retailers innovate around Silicon Valley

BY Carol Radice

Home to the famed Golden Gate Bridge, the other thing the City by the Bay is known for these days is its soaring cost of housing. Alongside Washington, D.C., and New York City, the Bay Area is one of the most expensive cities to live in the United States.

While low unemployment and robust job growth are pluses, a cost of living 64% above the national average makes the area unaffordable to live in, even when the average median household income is above $75,000.

The region encompasses such metro areas as San Francisco; Oakland, the 12th largest metro area in the country; and San Jose, the 31st-largest city in the country, along with smaller urban and rural areas. Some 7.4 million people live in the nine counties, 101 cities and 7,000 square miles that comprise the Bay Area.

The San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward metro area’s economy is growing significantly faster than any of the top-10 metro areas in the nation, and part of its success is directly connected to growth in the technology sector. Silicon Valley — the center of the technology industry — is located in the Bay Area. Companies such as Google, eBay, Apple and Facebook have headquarters here.

The city is a renowned hub for the incubation and development of emerging markets, but IT is not the only industry thriving here. Some 30 international financial institutions are located here as are a number of social and digital media, life sciences and biotech, environmental and clean tech, professional services and international businesses.

As would be expected in this area, retailers are often more progressive here than in other parts of the country, partly by choice and partly due to necessity. For this hipster, educated, affluent demographic, cookie-cutter approaches won’t suffice. As a result, several area retailers have added experiential components in their stores, a move they admit has been helpful in combatting declining sales. With an emphasis on entertainment and socialization, a number of retailers are adding bars, theaters, gaming and recreational areas in their locations. Nordstrom in San Jose has a bar and Whole Foods features a beer garden on its upper floor. Bass Pro Shop decided to add a bowling alley for its customers to use.

Given this, it also is no surprise that an eclectic combination of food retailers dot the landscape in the San Francisco-metro market. While shoppers will find such expected options as Safeway, Trader Joe’s and multiple Whole Foods Markets, a number of smaller grocers are thriving here as well. One particular standout is Mollie Stone’s. Since 1986, this family-owned business has offered “the best of both worlds” — conventional groceries, as well as natural and organic food, much of which is locally sourced.

This is a retailer that is not afraid to adapt or take risks. It became the first retailer in the San Francisco Bay Area to integrate a complete, full-service hardware store into the overall layout of its grocery departments. The new Mollie’s Ace Hardware is a one-stop shop for easy access to home improvement items.

Its San Mateo location offers Mollieland, a free supervised play area for children to hang out, while their parents shop. And in its Pacific Heights and Castro locations, customers can hop on the Mollie Bus. Recognizing how many city dwellers hate to give up their parking spots to run errands, the retailer came up with the idea of offering a free shuttle for shoppers, and customers love it.

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Panzer points to NACDS’ ability to drive partnership, engagement

BY DSN STAFF

PALM BEACH, Fla. — As retail undergoes a revolution, the key to delivering what consumers want is agility from retailers and suppliers, as well as maintaining a personal connection with shoppers, Albertsons’ Mark Panzer said in his first remarks as chairman of NACDS. He also highlighted NACDS’ ability to help retailers engage with each other to reach success through such events as NACDS Annual and Total Store Expo.

Panzer’s remarks were informed by his current role as senior vice president of pharmacy, health and wellness of Boise, Idaho-based Albertsons, which is leveraging digital tools to reach customers and is in the midst of an acquisition of Rite Aid, as well as by his more than 40-year career in retail that began at Osco Drug in the early 1970s. Throughout his career, Panzer said, he has seen the value of customer relationships shine through, even as the ways retailers build them have shifted.

“We have better tools, better data, better analytical skill,” Panzer said in his remarks that followed him receiving the chairman’s gavel from outgoing chairman and Walgreens Boots Alliance co-COO Alex Gourlay. “We need to utilize all of these things in this rapidly changing retail environment. But native intelligence, gained through frontline experience and face-to-face customer interaction, is invaluable and must still play a critical role at the decision-making table.”

He highlighted NACDS as a crucial facilitator of the conversations where retailers and suppliers decide their strategies in a changing environment — both through events and the organization’s Retail Advisory Board. “NACDS is doing a lot to bring retailers and suppliers together, to really tackle the issues of today and tomorrow.” Panzer said.

He also noted the way that NACDS maintains a focus on public policy measures that can help further members’ role in the lives of patients and customer through its Access Agenda’s focus on such issues as pharmacy provider status, direct and indirect remuneration fees and fighting the opioid epidemic. “When you look at all of the business challenges we are facing, I cannot emphasize enough, just how important it is to have NACDS representing all of us, and taking on these public policy issues,” he said.

Panzer’s speech Tuesday was preceded by remarks from Johnson &n Johnson U.S. chief customer officer David Pothast and Panzer presenting Gourlay with a plaque commemorating his time as chairman. His remarks were followed by educator Jim Collins, who spoke to attendees about what distinguishes great companies. As part of his talk, Collins discussed how companies that achieve greatness do so through large, ambitious goals that attract the best and brightest. His framework could also easily apply to such organizations as NACDS, whose membership Panzer noted comprises the best of the industry from companies of all sizes.

“If you’re not doing the hardest things, you’re not going to get the best people,” Collins said.

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SLIDESHOW: NACDS Annual 2018 Monday Nightlife – Nielsen Reception & Dinner

BY DSN STAFF

PALM BEACH, Fla. — Nielsen held its cocktail reception and dinner on Monday night at the Breakers during NACDS Annual Meeting.

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