PHARMACY

Alabama community pharmacy hosts MTM awareness event

BY Michael Johnsen

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — In recognition of the important role pharmacists can play in improving medication adherence, the National Consumers League last week hosted a "Script Your Future" event at a Birmingham, Ala.-area community pharmacy.
 
NCL’s "Script Your Future" is a national multi-year awareness campaign designed to help patients better manage their health by encouraging more open conversations between healthcare professionals and patients. The Birmingham event, which was hosted at Homewood Pharmacy, focused on the important role that all healthcare professionals, including pharmacists, have in helping patients better adhere to their medication.
 
“Instead of wringing our hands about the problem of non-adherence, it’s about bringing together stakeholders and looking at solutions,” National Community Pharmacists Association CEO Douglas Hoey said. “Solving this nation’s adherence issue will require the effort of doctors, nurses, pharmacists, as well as patients, which is why NCPA is a proud partner of the ‘Script Your Future’ campaign.”
 
“Research by the campaign and others shows that pharmacists are among the most trusted patient resources for information about medication and are in an exceptional front-line position to confront this issue,” said NCPA and Alabama Board of Pharmacy member Kenny Sanders. “We can help patients understand and anticipate side effects that might prevent them from taking their medication, can debunk myths or answer questions that patients forgot to ask their doctors, and can work with patients to find tools that help them make taking their medication a priority.”
 
The event brought together area stakeholders in health care, business and government, and consumer advocates,  to offer tools for patients to help them better adhere to their medication, and to help healthcare professionals better communicate with patients.
 
A study released in conjunction with the event shows that nationally and in Birmingham, those patients who do not always take their medication as directed are less likely to have received a full explanation of the consequences of their condition, and are less convinced of the importance of adherence.

The campaign features tools that include free text message reminders, sample questions for patients to ask healthcare practitioners, medication lists, condition management sheets, and fact sheets on common chronic conditions. All of these materials can be found on the campaign website, ScriptYourFuture.org.
 
Alabama governor Robert Bentley, who spoke at the event, encouraged patients with chronic conditions to speak with their healthcare professionals about their medications.
 
“Doctors, nurses, pharmacists and other healthcare professionals can help prevent many serious health complications by initiating conversations with their patients about the importance of taking medication as directed,” Bentley said. “This is especially important for people with chronic health conditions, such as diabetes, asthma and high blood pressure, who may have a number of medicines to take each day.”
 
Birmingham is one of six regional target markets in which the multi-year campaign is piloting interventions, outreach activities, research and advertising.


Interested in this topic? Sign up for our weekly Collaborative Care e-newsletter.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
PHARMACY

Nearly 60 franchisees file claims against Medicine Shoppe, Medicap

BY Alaric DeArment

ST. LOUIS — A group of Medicine Shoppe International and Medicap franchise owners is filing claims against the two companies over an alleged breach of contract and failure to support the franchise systems.

Calling themselves "Franchisees for Fair Value" and accusing MSI-Medicap parent company Cardinal Health of "unfair and predatory practices," the nearly 60 franchise owners said that in recent years, an "arbitrary decision by MSI/Medicap to stop supporting its own franchise system" has led to dwindling services, while the company has continued  to collect "exorbitant" franchise fees. Meanwhile, they said, MSI and Medicap have introduced an offer for new franchisees to join the system for $499 per month while charging the remaining franchisees royalties equal to more than 5% of store sales. Unlike retail pharmacy chains, MSI and Medical operate under a franchise system in which member pharmacies adopt the MSI or Medicap brand while continuing to operate as independent businesses.

Cardinal Health dismissed the group’s accusations.

“The overwhelming majority of our franchisees are pleased with the franchise system and its current offerings," Cardinal Health spokeswoman Tara Schumacher told Drug Store News. "We believe these claims are without merit, and we intend to vigorously defend our position.”

The complaint stems from a class-action suit filed in March 2010. The same organization, representing seven franchisees with more than 600 stores, sued Cardinal Health over the $499 fee for new franchisees, which the company introduced in July 2009, saying that Cardinal tried to renegotiate franchise agreements and then began reducing services across the board when it failed to reach its goal of getting 95% of stores to accept it, a claim that the company also dismissed at the time as having "no merit." In February of this year, a U.S. District Court judge in Ohio decided that the franchisees could refile individually in Missouri and Iowa, where MSI and Medicap originally had their headquarters, as opposed to filing a class-action suit.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
PHARMACY

FDA to review patch for HIV-related pain

BY Alaric DeArment

SAM MATEO, Calif. — A Food and Drug Administration expert panel will review a drug made by NeurogesX as a potential treatment for pain associated with HIV.

NeurogesX said Thursday that the FDA Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory Committee would meet on Feb. 9, 2012, to review the patch drug Qutenza (capsaicin) as a treatment for pain associated with HIV-associated peripheral neuropathy, or HIV-PN.

The drug currently is approved for treating pain associated with postherpetic neuralgia.

NeurogesX filed with the FDA for approval of the drug last month, and the agency expects to decide whether to approve it in early March. While the FDA usually follows the recommendations of advisory committees, it is not bound by them.


Interested in this topic? Sign up for our weekly Collaborative Care e-newsletter.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?