HEALTH

Mississippi legislators seek to reverse-switch PSE products

BY Michael Johnsen

JACKSON, Miss. Four Mississippi legislators earlier this month added the Magnolia State as one of those states actively seeking to reverse-switch pseudoephedrine products from its current status as behind-the-pharmacy-counter to prescription-only in an effort to curb methamphetamine production.

The measures were introduced Jan. 11 by Reps. Ed Blackmon, Jr., D-Madison and Stephen Holland, D-Lee, as well as Sens. Sidney Albritton, R-District 40, and Billy Hewes, R-Harrison.

According to published reports, Marshall Fisher, director of the Mississippi Bureau of Narcotics and proponent of the legislation, noted that last year marked the first time arrests for methamphetamine possession outnumbered those for crack or cocaine by a ratio of 3-to-2.

The measures were introduced despite an offer made late last year by member companies of the Consumer Healthcare Products Association to fund an electronic logging system that could track PSE purchases across states. In November, the National Association of Drug Diversion Investigators unveiled the National Precursor Log Exchange (NPLEx), a multi-state electronic tracking program that enforces purchase limitations of the decongestant pseudoephedrine in real-time at the point of sale. The new NPLEx system has been adopted by Kentucky, Illinois and Louisiana.

“If states are wanting to make [PSE] a prescription drug, we are coming in and saying, ‘Here is a tool [being offered to] law enforcement at no cost,’” commented Charlie Cichon NADDI director, at the time of the announcement last fall.

In addition to Mississippi, California and several local jurisdictions are either considering or have passed legislation requiring a prescription for the common decongestant.

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AccuDial featured on T.V. show

BY Michael Johnsen

HOLLYWOOD, Calif. AccuDial Pharmaceutical’s AccuDial product was featured Thursday afternoon on an episode of CBS’ “The Doctors” as one possible solution to a common problem facing parents — how much cough syrup should they give their children?

“Studies show that children are given an inaccurate dose of over-the-counter medication more than half the time by parents,” commented Dr. Jim Sears, a board certified pediatrician and one of the featured doctors on the program. “Pediatricians, we always dose by weight,” he said. “But a lot of the over-the-counter [medicines] give an age range — six to 12 years old — a huge range.”

Sears then held an AccuDial label up to the camera, explaining that the patented label could be rotated so that parents could determine proper dosage by weight. A dosage spoon is included with the medicine, Sears added.

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NAD supports Quten Research Institute’s dietary supplement claims

BY Michael Johnsen

NEW YORK The National Advertising Division of the Council of Better Business Bureaus has determined that Quten Research Institute can support certain claims made for its Qunol CoQ10 dietary supplement, though recommended the company modify certain other claims.

NAD, the advertising industry’s self-regulatory forum, examined print and Internet advertising for Qunol CoQ10, following a challenge by the Council for Responsible Nutrition.

The company has said it will appeal a portion of NAD’s decision to the National Advertising Review Board, though Quten Research asserted it had voluntarily discontinued several of the claims at issue — most notably disease-state-type claims that would have run the company afoul of the Federal Trade Commission.

In addition, the Quten represented that it permanently discontinued its “Doctor Recommended CoQ10 Formula” claim and modified its claim “Clinically Proven,” to read, “The hydrosoluble CoQ10 in Qunol softgels has been used in several clinical studies.”

NAD noted that the advertiser had modified its “Clinically Proven” claim to state that “The hydrosoluble CoQ10 in Qunol softgels has been used in several clinical studies,” but found that modified version could be understood by consumers to mean that the product has been proven effective in clinical studies, a claim that is not supported.

NAD found that Qunol provided a reasonable basis for its claims that its Qunol soft gel product is “up to 300% more absorbable…” but recommended that the advertiser clarify the point of comparison – specifically that Qunol is “up to 300% more absorbable” than a standard powder form of CoQ10.

NAD, however, recommended that Qunol discontinue its claim that Liquid Qunol is “Up to 6X better absorption than regular CoQ10.” as well as the claim that “100 mg Qunol Liquid CoQ10 = up to 600 mg regular CoQ10.” since these claims are based solely on the results of laboratory, rather than human, testing.

Qunol, in its advertiser’s statement, stated it respectfully disagrees with NAD’s findings regarding the claim that Qunol liquid CoQ10 provides “up to 6x better absorption,” and will appeal that finding to the National Advertising Review Board.

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