HEALTH

Heel Defender Orthotic Insoles selected for clinical trial

BY Antoinette Alexander

Defender Operations announced on Tuesday that its flagship product, Heel Defender Comfort Orthotic Insoles, has been selected for use in a clinical trial of a new treatment for Achilles Tendonitis.

The treatment entails the injection of a bioactive tissue matrix allograft to promote healing of chronic Achilles Tendonitis. A clinical trial is currently underway to investigate the therapeutic results of this treatment. Potentially, this therapy could help millions suffering from their painful and debilitating foot condition.

An important part of the clinical trial is the use of Heel Defender Comfort Orthotic Insoles by patients post-treatment to offload the pressure on their heel when standing or walking.

“Heel Defender orthotics are simply the best solution available on the market for decreasing pressure on the painful heel,” said Jason Hanft, a Miami foot and ankle surgeon with more than 30 years of experience. Hanft invented Heel Defender after his own heel was crushed in an accident and he could not find an effective orthotic to relieve his chronic foot pain. He developed Heel Defender to meet his own need and help others. The product is currently sold on Amazon.

 

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Cold sore brand launches initiative to restore sun-damaged murals

BY Antoinette Alexander

This summer GSK Consumer Healthcare’s Abreva, an OTC cold sore medication, is lending a hand to local communities by restoring the faces of some of their most beloved murals.

The brand is launching the initiative to remind consumers that UV rays are a common trigger of cold sores.

To restore beauty to more than just human faces, Abreva has partnered with CITYarts in New York City and the Chicago Public Art Group to restore five murals in the New York and Chicago areas. Abreva donated $20,000 to each organization to fund the restorations.

“Murals are a fixture of many local communities and when they are faded and run down, these neighborhoods feel less than beautiful, which is similar to how people with cold sores feel,” said Rishi Mulgund, senior brand manager, Abreva. “We’re excited to give back to the community, educate about the impact of UV rays and restore beauty to all kinds of faces this summer.”

In New York City, the brand’s donation will support the restoration of “CITYarts Mosaic Peace Wall” in Harlem, “Alice on the Wall” and the “Flowering Vine” murals. In Chicago, it will support the restoration of “Childhood is Without Prejudice” and “Another Time’s Voice Remembers My Passion’s Humanity” murals. The restorations will take place throughout the summer.

 

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Study: Many diabetics forgo care because of high costs

BY Antoinette Alexander

Nearly half of people living with diabetes have, at times, gone without care because they can’t afford it, according to a report recently released by UpWell Health, a provider of healthcare services, support, and solutions for people living with chronic conditions.

In its True Cost of Diabetes report, UpWell surveyed more than 5,000 people living with diabetes and determined that 45 percent have gone without diabetes care at times because they couldn’t afford it. What’s more, the “costs” of this chronic health condition are more than just financial, impacting relationships, recreation, employment, mental health, and more.

“The report shines a light on the impact diabetes can have on one’s lifestyle and amplifies the real disconnect that often exists between physicians, pharmacists, insurance providers, and patients, which can lead to patient frustration and further disease progression,” said Alison Wistner, CEO of UpWell Health. “There is a tremendous opportunity to simplify chronic care management by giving patients the ability and resources to obtain their medications and adhere to their prescription plan. We feel that doing so will help people live simpler, healthier, and more empowered lives.”

Trends uncovered in the report include:

Self-care tasks add up: Many of the chores associated with good diabetes management have to be done over and over again. Forty-one percent of respondents check blood sugar one to two times daily, while 29 percent check it three to five times every day. Forty-five percent take diabetes medicine twice a day; 24 percent take it three to four times daily. Ten percent take four or more diabetes medicines. Twenty-eight percent go to their pharmacy for diabetes needs two to four times a month.

Living with diabetes isn’t cheap: The American Diabetes Association recently found average diabetes-related medical expenses to be approximately $7,900 per person, per year. Some of those costs are not fully covered by health insurance and some people don’t have insurance. Thirty-four percent of respondents spent $100 to $500 of their own money for diabetes doctor care in the past year. Forty-three percent paid up to $1,000 out of pocket in the past year for treating diabetes complications, while 16 percent paid a staggering $1,000-$5,000.

Diabetes affects more than the person who has it: Caregivers may feel stressed. Partners may worry about whether their companion is taking proper care of him or herself. Children might not understand when a parent doesn’t feel well and has to cancel a family activity. Coworkers may suspect a colleague with diabetes isn’t pulling his or her share of the workload. The list goes on. Thirty-seven percent of respondents said diabetes has harmed relationships with loved ones, friends, or coworkers. More than half (55 percent) missed work in the past year because of diabetes, while 38 percent had to give up hobbies, activities, or other interests.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 1-out-of-10 Americans has diabetes — and that number is growing steadily.

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