HEALTH

Avadim Technologies intros new leg cramp solution

BY Michael Johnsen

ASHEVILLE, N.C. — Avadim Technologies on Tuesday introduced its newest topical therapy, Theraworx Relief, a fast-absorbing foam or spray that can be applied daily to prevent muscle cramps and spasms, or as needed to release a cramp quickly and reduce muscle soreness.

"Theraworx Relief is unlike anything that's currently on the market today," stated Steve Woody, CEO Avadim Technologies. "We look forward to becoming the most trusted over-the-counter therapy as we alleviate muscle cramps for the millions of Americans that struggle with this chronic health problem every day."

Theraworx Relief's is made from a proprietary blend of ingredients that work with the body's own natural functions to relieve and even prevent cramps and spasms.

The launch of Theraworx Relief will be supported by an advertising campaign, the company reported, which kicked off July 31. The campaign is produced by GR Match, which is an affiliate of El Segundo based Guthy-Renker, one of the larger direct to consumer marketers. Television commercials are scheduled to launch in Q4 2017.
 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Perrigo: Consumer acceptance and health cost mitigation propelling OTC store brands

BY Michael Johnsen

DUBLIN — As more consumers continue to capitalize on the value of a national brand equivalent through the appeal of the kind of own brand mindset many retailers have today, private label has never looked so promising. Not only is there continued growth in core categories due to the migration of consumers from national brand to store brand, but also the potential for new OTC product classes to emerge as the administration struggles to make healthcare more affordable.

"Store brand growth continues to outpace national brand growth in almost every major category," John Hendrickson, CEO Perrigo, told analysts Thursday. "This is really driven by continued consumer acceptance of store brand products and the launch of store brand products in categories where national brands previously held exclusive share," he said. "Over the past three months the growth of store brand is particularly prominent in the cough, cold, allergy, and sinus category, which is driven by store brand Fluticasone among other products. In addition, new products are continuing to drive growth in the smoking cessation categories."

According to Perrigo, citing IRI data for the latest 13 weeks ended July 9 covering products sold through U.S. multi-outlets, total OTC store brand growth outpaced both national brand growth and overall category growth. That was particularly pronounced across cough/cold/allergy, where sales of store brand solutions were up 6% in the period as compared to 4.4% category growth and 3.7% national brand growth. There is a similar story across gastrointestinal, where store brand growth totaled 2.4% v. 1.2% overall category growth and 0.5% national brand growth.

Within gastrointestinals, there is still one blockbuster brand, Pfizer's Nexium 24HR, that does not yet have private label competition. Hendrickson suggested the initial private label opporunity represented 20% of national brand sales.

In this case, sales of Nexium totaled almost $300 million for the 52 weeks ended June 11 across total U.S. multi-outlets, according to IRI data provided to Drug Store News. That would represent a $60 million total market store brand opportunity.

Moving forward, the bigger opportunty is within those categories that are not sold OTC yet. "You think about the talk that's going on in government about, boy, we're paying too much here, all of those things, it's created this stir on the Rx side," Hendrickson said. "It also creates an impetus to say, how do we manage that cost? You bring products over the counter. And so, it really gets the FDA starting to think not just about getting products approved for an Rx market, but also which categories make sense to switch?"

Some of the low-hanging fruit may include skin care products and migraine.  "[The] derm category, many of those are natural products to switch," Hendrickson said. "They're not billion dollar categories, but they're natural products that are safe, effective, could be self-prescribed, could be over the counter. … Migraine, another one. We have certain migraine products over the counter now, but certainly switching some of those are also kind of key ones."

Erectile dysfunction remains on the horizon, especially given the fact that Sanofi bought the OTC rights for Cialis. That may give rise to a more inclusive role for pharmacists in dispensing these medicines, Hendrickson suggested. "Will [an ED OTC class] come over by themselves?" Hendrickson asked "[Or] will there have to be a pharmacist saying, hey, do you have a heart condition? Okay. You can take this. Who knows what intervention there will be?"

And if pharmacists are tasked with patient intervention on appropriate self-selection for ED medications, that re-opens the door for statins. "[Statins] belong over the counter," Hendrickson said. "Some kind of pharmacy intervention could make them out over the counter, almost like a third class," he said. "That certainly has been tried; not quite there, yet."

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

RLA Collective publishes four-part report on how to best reach the ‘new mom’

BY Michael Johnsen

PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y. – When it comes to pregnant and new moms, more than three quarters (77%) say a “doctor recommended” seal is important when purchasing OTCs, according to a  new four-part survey titled, “Mom-Shop Report, A National Survey of New Moms’ Shopping Behavior,” conducted by RLA Collective, Persuadable Research and the Mommy MD Guides.

“Pregnant and new moms are a unique demographic that comes with a distinct set of behaviors,” stated Robin Russo, president RLA Collective.  “Some of the results of this comprehensive survey opened our eyes to key insights about how this group seeks out and purchases health and wellness brands.”

One of the more surprising findings, for example, suggests that brands should consider targeting baby boomer grandmothers who are among the biggest influencers for new moms. Other key findings include:

  • While mobile is used to research by more than half of new moms, 66% are purchasing OTCs from brick-and-mortar mass merchandisers, 57% from local chain drug and 44% from grocery stores. Meanwhile, 22% are purchasing online from Amazon.com and 10% from online drug stores;
  • Facebook is key to this group: Nearly 7 in 10 women across all life stages have “liked” a brand’s Facebook page in the last six months and the number of brand pages liked or followed is very high: 29% of the moms say they liked 21 or more Facebook brand pages; and
  • Regarding motherhood, the majority of new moms (50%) were just “somewhat” prepared for this big life change. Just slightly more than one quarter (28%) were “very” prepared.

Focusing primarily on personal care, OTC and supplements, the body of information is being presented in four downloadable reports at RLA Collective's web site that look at what makes this phase of life special and provide insights into new moms’ entry into parenthood and how they make purchase decisions for these categories of products. Included in the survey were 1,050 women randomly drawn from a national sample of first- and second-time pregnant and first-time moms with children ranging from birth through 36 months.
 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?