News

Cota expands Novartis agreement

BY Brian Berk

NEW YORK — Cota Healthcare inked a multi-year collaboration agreement with Novartis to help improve clinical and cost outcomes for breast cancer patients.

As part of this agreement, which expands significantly on the previous announced collaboration entered into January 2016, teams from across Novartis will leverage Cota's research-grade, real-world evidence, web-based analysis and visualization tools, and be supported by Cota's medical, data science, and technology experts. Utilizing the real-world evidence and technology platform supplied by Cota, it states it is expected to enable Novartis to accelerate clinical development of new therapies for breast cancer and identify which patients will benefit most.

"Data and insight that comes directly from patient records — real-world evidence — is transforming how pharmaceutical and life science companies develop more precise, targeted therapies," said John Hervey, CEO of Cota. "Novartis has been an incredible collaborator over the last several years in adopting Cota's real-world evidence solutions to advance our shared goal of quantifiably improving and extending patient lives."

Cota, a data and technology platform for value-based precision medicine, is powered by the patented Cota Nodal Address system, a digital classification methodology that stratifies patients based on all the personal and clinical factors that matter to the individual.

"We're excited about helping Novartis get deep insight into how patients are getting treatment in practice and connecting the dots all the way from patient to doctor to researcher," said Dr. Andrew Pecora, Founder and Executive Chairman of Cota. "Analyzing this data using CNAs is a critical factor in enabling healthcare companies to develop and target therapies that increase outcomes and lower the total cost of care."

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
News

The Exchange generates $8.3 billion, dispurses $224 million in dividends

BY Michael Johnsen

DALLAS — The Exchange on Friday released a video touting the military retailer's fiscal 2017 financials. The Exchange raised $8.3 billion in revenue, a decline of 2.4% compared to the year-ago period, while earnings were down 3.5% to $388 million.

The Exchange dispursed $224 million in dividends in the last year, which supports the military and their families. In the past 10 years, the Exchange has distributed more than $2.4 billion to fund quality-of-life improvements. The Exchange retains one-third of annual earnings to construct new stores, modernize regional distribution centers and upgrade its worldwide network to operate retail stores.

Toward that end, the Exchange funded 43 facility improvements and new store openings over the past year, including the Exchange's newest distribution center at Germersheim Army Depot in Germany on Feb. 1, 2017. The distribution center ships beverages, boxed food, appliances and more to Exchange main stores and Express locations throughout Europe, Southwest Asia and contingency locations.

Currently, 85% of Exchange employees are connected to the military family. 

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
News

House GOP pulls ACA replacement bill ahead of vote

BY David Salazar
WASHINGTON — After a week spent trying to whip the 215 votes needed to pass the American Health Care Act — the House GOP replacement for the Affordable Care Act — Republican leadership withdrew the bill from consideration Friday afternoon, sending the House into recess. Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., held a press conference in which he explained his rationale for pulling the bill, noting that he spoke to President Donald Trump before doing so and the president agreed with the decision. 
 
“I will not sugarcoat this. This is a disappointing day for us,” Ryan said at the news conference. “Doing big things is hard. All of us will need time to reflect on how we got to this moment and how we could do it better.” 
 
Ahead of the vote, the bill was not expected to pass, with the New York Times tallying 33 “no” votes among House Republicans — about 10 more than the maximum 22 opposed votes that the legislation could have survived. It tallied 150 votes in favor, 45 undecided and nine who were leaning no or had concerns about the bill. 
 
Despite the uncertainty, Thursday night, Trump’s director of the Office of Management and Budget, Mick Mulvaney, reportedly told House Republicans that they would need to vote Friday, or the president would leave the ACA in place and pursue the rest of his policy agenda. 
 
The president tried to drum up support on Twitter Friday, tweeting, “After seven horrible years of ObamaCare (skyrocketing premiums & deductibles, bad healthcare), this is finally your chance for a great plan!”
 
In the lead-up to the vote, White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer said in Friday’s press briefing that the president had “called every member” and “done every single thing he can…to get this thing through,” noting that the president has made clear that House Republicans would be “the ones who have to go back and answer to their constituents why they didn’t fulfill a pledge that they made,” namely the repeal of the ACA that many campaigned on.
 
“You’ve all heard me say this before — moving from an opposition party to a governing party comes with growing pains — and, well, we’re feeling those growing pains today,” Ryan said. “I’m really proud of the bill we produced. It would make a dramatic improvement in our healthcare system and provide relief by people hurting under Obamacare.”
 
“This was a victory for all Americans. Democrats — united by our shared values — have stood strong against the disastrous #TrumpCare bill,” House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., tweeted Friday afternoon. 
 
But Friday’s bill withdrawal leaves the healthcare debate far from over. A recent Harvard-Harris Poll survey found that, though 51% of those surveyed felt the AHCA would have been a step backward, 49% still favor repealing and replacing the ACA. The survey found that 64% felt controlling healthcare costs was the highest healthcare priority, compared with 36% who felt the top priority should be covering more people.
 
keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?