BEAUTY CARE

Wrenchers Body Shop’s natural skin care line making mark in tattoo industry

BY Antoinette Alexander

FALLBROOK, Calif. — As tattoos increasingly penetrate mainstream culture, Wrenchers Body Shop has seen an uptick in sales within the body art industry of its Hands Maid and Babied Hands line of botanical skin care launched in early 2012, and now the company is seeking manufacturer representatives to assist in marketing.

With its headquarters located near the major West Coast base of the United States Marine Corps, Camp Pendleton, Wrenchers has seen a decided uptick in sales of its products to the body art industry. After soldiers complete their training there, they are often covered with tattoos but soon realize they need to take care of their body art to protect both their skin and newly acquired investments. While body art is considered highly fashionable, certain safeguards should be taken to protect tattooed skin from petrochemical solvents, lye-based soaps or heavy-duty solvent skin cleansers, the company stated. Until now, many conventional products did more harm than good. Many hand cleaners, for example, contain pumice, or volcanic rock — which takes its toll by removing much more than just grease and grime on your hands.

"Many products made for tattoo aftercare are ointments, which tend to cover the skin and can clog pores. Botanical lotions are absorbed into the skin, providing tissue hydration," stated Edward Buscis, managing member of Wrenchers. "Often, aftercare products contain synthetic and petrochemicals in their formulations that may include propylene glycol, lanolin, and mineral oil."

The company stated that a growing number of tattoo shops have climbed aboard the Wrenchers bandwagon in praising the efficacy of its products for helping protect clients’ skin and their body art.

"The owner of a local tattoo shop who has been in business for over 20 years here says our products are really making a difference for his customers," added Buscis. "Our lotion protects not only their skin, but also the artwork that was applied to their body. For a body artist, the skin is their canvas — it’s a one-of-a-kind image that can’t be reproduced."

Wrechers is currently seeking manufacturer representatives to assist in marketing to the tattoo industry, especially those who deal with skin art care. In addition, both Hands Maid and Babied Hands are being well-received independently across the nation as Wrenchers continues to expand its reach into other commercial markets and global distribution, the company stated.


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D.DERSONE says:
Feb-04-2013 01:41 am

good article

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BEAUTY CARE

Burt’s Bees Baby establishes its first DTC digital channel powered by Demandware Commerce

BY Antoinette Alexander

BURLINGTON, Mass. — Demandware, a provider of on-demand e-commerce, has announced that Burt’s Bees Baby, a specialty brand featuring natural, organic products for babies and moms, has launched a new e-commerce site, BurtsBeesBaby.com, on the Demandware Commerce platform. The new site represents the company’s first direct-to-consumer channel and will be followed by a mobile site, also powered by Demandware, in the coming months.

 “Our goal is to become the No. 1 organic baby brand in the world, and our new direct-to-consumer site is a major step toward making this a reality,” stated Michelle Visser, CEO of Burt’s Bees Baby. “With Demandware, we have a robust commerce platform that enables us to execute our merchandising strategies quickly and easily and will scale to support our company’s growth. We’re confident that with Demandware we have found a true partner who is as committed to our success as we are.”

Burt’s Bees Baby is a trademark of Burt’s Bees Licensing, used under the license Ayablu. Burt’s Bees is a manufacturer of natural health and beauty care products.

Items currently include apparel, bath linens, gift sets and accessories, with bedding to be added this coming July. The retailer also has plans to expand across the baby, home and lifestyle categories to include gear, playtime, furniture and seasonal items. Features such as a guided search, a baby registry, ratings and reviews, a store locator and integration with social media help consumers find and evaluate products quickly and easily.

 

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Campaigners celebrate as EU set to ban animal testing for cosmetics

BY Antoinette Alexander

LONDON — A ban on importing and selling animal-tested cosmetics products and ingredients will enter into force in March. The ban affects all cosmetics, including toiletries and beauty products.

"I believe that the ban should enter into force in March 2013 as Parliament and Council already have decided. I therefore am not planning to propose a postponement or derogation to the ban," Commissioner Tonio Borg wrote in a recent letter to animal testing campaigners.

After more than 20 years of campaigning, beauty retailer The Body Shop, who will not be affected by the ban as it has always been against animal testing, and nonprofit organization Cruelty Free International are celebrating the end to animal testing for cosmetics in Europe. This means that from March 11 onward, anyone who wishes to sell new cosmetic products and ingredients in the EU must not test them on animals anywhere in the world, the groups stated.

To celebrate the victory, The Body Shop and Cruelty Free International stated that they are launching a range of special commemorative activities in the countdown to March 11.

The groups stated that the proposed ban sends a strong message worldwide in support of cruelty-free beauty, and to particular countries such as China, who still demand animal testing for cosmetics, to also respond and ban testing on animals.

"This is truly an historic event and the culmination of more than 20 years of campaigning. Now we will apply our determination and vision on a global stage to ensure that the rest of the world follows this lead,” stated Cruelty Free International CEO Michelle Thew.

In 1991, the BUAV — founder of Cruelty Free International — established a European coalition of leading animal protection organizations across Europe, or ECEAE, with the objective to end the use of animal testing for cosmetics. This set in motion a high-profile public and political campaign across Europe spanning more than 20 years. In 1993, The Body Shop, the first beauty company to take action on animal testing for cosmetics, supported the campaign by enlisting the support of its consumers across Europe. Three years later in 1996, Dame Anita Roddick, founder of The Body Shop, joined members of the ECEAE and MEPs in presenting a petition containing 4 million signatures to the European Commission.

In 2012, the BUAV established Cruelty Free International, the first global organization dedicated to ending cosmetics animal testing worldwide. The Body Shop, together with Cruelty Free International, launched a new international campaign, which has so far resulted in customers from 55 countries signing a global pledge supporting an end to animal testing for cosmetics forever.

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