HEALTH

Will Vitamin Packs do to VMS what Dollar Shave Club did to razors?

BY Michael Johnsen

SEATTLE — Vitamin Packs on Thursday entered the personalized nutrition market using a proprietary algorithm called Sage that uses inputs about lifestyle and nutrition habits while examining more than 650 potential medication interactions to recommend supplements that are personalized for each customer.

"We are thrilled to introduce Vitamin Packs to health-conscious Americans who want to achieve better health through nutrition," stated Jason Brown, CEO Vitamin Packs. "Nutrition is more than a one-size-fits-all approach – it's about understanding how your body works, what fuels it for success and how it interacts with prescription medications. A number of factors can impact vitamin, mineral and nutrient needs," he said. "That's why personalized nutrition is so important, and that's why we created Vitamin Packs. Our supplement recommendations are designed to provide only what your body needs. No more, no less."

Vitamin Packs' start dates back to 1999 when the founders saw an opportunity to personalize nutrition for consumers through intelligent technology they developed called "Vitamin Advisor." Today, the company introduced the next generation of its technology – Sage – which thrives on information it collects from peer-reviewed scientific studies, patient visits and the wisdom of Vitamin Packs' expert physicians and nutritionists.

"It's refreshing to work with a company that is passionate about tailoring nutrition to individual needs and wants," commented Michael Roizen, the original chief wellness officer of the Cleveland Clinic and chairman of Vitamin Packs' science advisory board. "Vitamin Packs takes the guesswork out of nutrition by being a trusted wellness advisor, and I'm honored to provide my medical perspective to help shape holistic health for consumers."

To ensure accuracy of vitamin and nutrient recommendations, the Vitamin Packs' science advisory board monitors and evaluates the latest nutrition and lifestyle scientific research.

Vitamin Packs' free Nutritional Assessment can be accessed at www.vitaminpacks.com to reveal the vitamin and nutrient combinations that are unique to a customer's body, lifestyle and health habits. Every month, a 28-day supply of vitamins and nutrients individually packaged in tear-off pouches are delivered to the customer.

It costs as low as $1 per day for Vitamin Packs, depending on the number of recommended supplements customers choose to add to their daily regimen. Customers may cancel the service at any time. Subscriptions include unlimited access to a personalized Knowledge Center where customers will receive nutrition and wellness news, tips and insights curated by Vitamin Packs' experts.
 

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HEALTH

Nicholas Hall challenges OTC marketers to do better in latest conference

BY Michael Johnsen

MORRISTOWN, N.J. — Nicholas Hall hosted its first regional North American OTC Conference here late last month, presenting a lineup that featured topical, on-point discussions and presentations around the business of over-the-counter medicines in the U.S.

“The [OTC] market is slightly underperforming the key metrics,” stated Nicholas Hall, chairman and CEO, in his opening address. “Is the model broken?” he asked. “That’s the challenge today,” he continued. “Should we change the model? And the second question, if the answer to that is ‘yes,’ how do we change the model?”
Hall was followed by a gloves-off panel discussion hosted by Mike Tarino, principal Tiltas Solutions, on how the current political climate is shaping OTC opportunities. “The [Trump] administration is interested in moving control over the [healthcare] financial resources more toward consumers,” Tarino commented. “They’ll do that with tax credits [and] they’ll do that by expanding the reach and absolute dollars that are in the health savings accounts.”
Other panelists included Sandra Morris of Procter & Gamble, Mike Thompson from the National Alliance for Healthcare Purchaser Coalitions and Dennis Marco, formerly of Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield.
Drug Store News correspondent Ed Rowland, principal of the consultancy firm Rowland Global, provided an update on Boots UK and implications for the Walgreens Boots Alliance in the Americas. And Scott Emerson, CEO of the Emerson Group, shortly followed with a presentation on the import of innovation across the OTC platform. Also on the first day a pair of Johnson and Johnson executives, Geoff Betrus and Lynn Hall, shared a little of what they’ve been doing around consumer healthcare and retail partnerships. “There is a role for our industry in supporting patients,” Betrus said. “How do we think about an ecosystem approach to healthcare? How do we start to enroll not only the manufacturer and the retailer, but how do we start to enroll the health systems and the payers?”
The first-day afternoon sessions began with Monica Wood, VP global consumer healthcare and member insights for Herbalife Nutrition, detailing key learnings for OTC companies in benchmarking the direct selling industry. Tine Hansen-Turton, executive director Convenient Care Association, discussed the value proposition of convenient care and how retail-based healthcare clinics can build a culture of consumer-driven healthcare. And Thierry Garrier, director marketing, dietary supplements at DSM, presented some of the new technological advances in consumer healthcare.
Patrick Spear, president and CEO GMDC, closed the first day with an analysis on how health and wellness can be positioned as a successful retail strategy to help recapture lost foot traffic. “Foot traffic is showing a declining trend as consumers shift to online purchases [and] click-and-collect,” Spear said. “But there are still large, untapped opportunties within the retail setting,” he added. “The key thing is to develop a shopper-centric focus,” he said, that draws the consumer to the retailer, whether it’s online or in-store.

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H2-Pharma launches multivitamin line for those with malabsorption conditions

BY Michael Johnsen

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — H2-Pharma on Wednesday launched their MultiVitamin ABDEK family of vitamin offerings. MultiVitamin ABDEKs are specifically formulated for individuals with malabsorption conditions, such as Cystic Fibrosis, that have difficulty in absorbing fat-soluble vitamins.

"We are pleased to make available the ABDEKs line of vitamins that fit a specific need, and we will continue to support patients and their caregivers with specialized needs with our future offerings," stated Bryce Harvey, president H2-Pharma. "Our commitment is and will continue to be to foster innovation within our industry by developing new ideas and programs which will benefit each one of our customers and partners."

H2's ABDEK product line provide key fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K) in a water-miscible form, as well as essential vitamins from the water-soluble group like vitamin C and the B-complex vitamins.

MultiVitamin ABDEKs are gluten-free, and are available in 3 dosage forms: chewable tablets, pediatric drops and softgel capsules. In addition, H2's MultiVitamin ABDEKs meet the daily recommended vitamin supplementation suggested by the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation when taken as directed.

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