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Whole grain diet may lower Type 2 diabetes risk, study finds

BY Allison Cerra

NEW YORK Lowering one’s risk of developing Type 2 diabetes can be as simple as implementing whole grains into a diet.

Qi Sun of Harvard School of Public Health in Boston and colleagues analyzed data from 39,765 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and 157,463 women in the Nurses’ Health Study I and II. All of the participants did not have diabetes, heart disease or cancer at the start of the studies.

During follow-up, the researchers found 10,507 incidents of Type 2 diabetes. Conversely, the researchers found that people who ate five or more servings per week of white rice were 17% more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes than those who ate less than one serving of white rice per month.

People who ate two or more servings of brown rice per week, however, were 11% less likely to develop Type 2 diabetes than those who ate less than one serving of brown rice per month.

“We estimated that replacing 50 grams/day intake of white rice with the same amount of brown rice was associated with a 16% lower risk of Type 2 diabetes, whereas the same replacement with whole grains as a group was associated with a 36 percent lower diabetes risk,” Sun said.

The study was presented Wednesday at the American Heart Association’s Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism Conference in San Francisco.

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Kellogg’s seeks weight-loss claim for cereal in Europe

BY Allison Cerra

NEW YORK Kellogg’s is seeking approval from the European Food Safety Authority for verbiage that denotes the its products help consumers lose weight.

The wording, which reads “can help to reduce body weight, can help to reduce body fat, can help to reduce waist circumference,” currently is awaiting approval under Articles 13.5 and 13.1, which allow weight health relationship claims for generic ready-to-eat breakfast cereals and parallel article claim applications, respectively.

“We are very confident about our scientific evidence having conducted clinical trials around the world, and having peer reviewed studies in our portfolio,” said Marta Baffigo, public affairs director Europe for Kellogg’s to NutraIngredients.

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FDA survey notes increased awareness of diet, heart disease link

BY Allison Cerra

SILVER SPRING, Md. Consumers who often read food labels are increasingly aware of the link between diet and heart disease, according to the Food and Drug Administration’s recent Health and Diet Survey.

The survey, which was conducted in 2008 via telephone of more than 2,500 adults in every state and the District of Columbia, noted that 91% of consumers were aware of the diet-heart disease relationship, an 8% jump since 2002.

The FDA also found that awareness that trans fats in the diet may raise the risk of heart disease nearly doubled over just four years, from 32% in 2004 to 62% in the recent survey. Additionally, the majority of consumers surveyed (81%) knew that certain foods or drinks may help prevent heart disease or heart attacks, including omega-3 fatty acids (52% from 31% in 2004), and many acknowleged (74%) that saturated fat may raise the risk of heart disease.

This is the 10th such survey since 1982. The most recent previous surveys were conducted in 2002 and 2004.

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