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BEAUTY CARE

What’s influencing how moms shop

BY DSN STAFF

Having a baby changes everything — including shopping behavior, according to new insights from pregnancy and parenting resource BabyCenter, a Johnson & Johnson company. The company’s “2017 Skincare and Bathtime Study,” shared exclusively with Drug Store News, points to lasting changes that new parents undergo in terms of what they look for from their personal care products once they have children, as well as the top factors influencing their buying decisions.

In terms of influence, physicians carry the top spot, with 50% of moms listing their physician as a resource, and 95% of those moms saying they are somewhat or very influenced by their recommendations. But previous experience with a brand also is among the top five influences cited, with 27% of moms saying it influences them. Of the moms influenced by prior experiences, 94% said this is a somewhat or very influential factor in their purchase decision.

While only about 11% of respondents said in-store displays influence them, 64% of those people said that it’s somewhat or very influential in their purchase decision. These numbers are slightly higher among pharmacy shoppers, with 13% saying that in-store displays are a resource for them, and 65% of these respondents said that they are somewhat or very influential on their decisions.

The influence that in-store displays hold is indicative of the larger potential role that the store can play in capturing parents’ dollars — especially when they’re buying a new product. Fifty-four percent of respondents said that they make a first-time purchase exclusively in store, compared with 8% who purchase mostly and exclusively online for the first time. But when it comes to repurchasing, only 41% said they do so exclusively in store, with 25% saying they do repurchasing mostly in store and occasionally online, 22% repurchasing online and in store equally, and 11% buying mostly or exclusively online.

Amazon.com ranked third among places parents purchased skin and hair care products for their children — 29% of parents shopped on Amazon compared with 59% who went to Target and 45% who went to Walmart. And while mass is the top shopping destination, three drug retailers collectively made up 29% of shopping trips from parents, with 13% going to Walgreens, 12% shopping at CVS and 4% choosing Rite Aid.

Indeed, despite making up less than a third of shopping trips, the pharmacy-shopping parent is the most valuable. BabyCenter’s research found that 63% of pharmacy shoppers said they spend more on their children’s skin care products than they do on themselves, and overall, pharmacy shoppers spend 47% more than the average consumer, spending $107.73 dollars on average.

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BEAUTY CARE

Consumers encouraged to buy, apply more sunscreen

BY DSN STAFF

After years of ignoring warnings that sun exposure poses a health risk and hastens aging, consumers are starting to see the light. In fact, overall category sales rose 6.7% for the 52-week period ended May 14 across multi-outlets, according to IRI. Lotions and oils advanced almost 7%, and sunscreens and bug repellants jumped 3.5%.

But retailers and marketers said much more needs to be done. A recent Marist Institute for Public Opinion Poll said only 1-in-10 people apply sunscreen regularly.

“We are seeing cases of melanoma on the rise, but [sun care protection] penetration is flat. Only 50% of households are buying sunscreen, so there’s plenty of head space to get people not currently using [to start] — or those using to reapply more frequently …,” said Lisa Perez, director of marketing for Coppertone.

That sentiment is reflected at Edgewell, makers of Banana Boat and Hawaiian Tropic. WIth the company’s “1,2,3” marketing initiative. The first step, or “1,” encourages application of 1 oz. — or a golf ball-sized amount — of sunscreen for each application; “2” is to remind users to reapply every two hours; and “3” is to “love your sun scene.”

Retailers and suppliers are doing more to encourage consumers to buy and apply more often. CVS announced it was removing all sun care products with SPF lower than 15 from shelves, and added more than 30 new SPF-plus-broad-spectrum products. CVS Pharmacy and Johnson & Johnson partnered with the American Cancer Society to create exclusive content for in-store signage, CVS.com and the CVS Pharmacy circular, while CVS Pharmacy beauty consultants will share information and tips on the importance of proper sun care and skin health with customers. And from June 18 to 25, Johnson & Johnson donated $1 to the American Cancer Society for every Neutrogena or Aveeno product with SPF 15 or higher purchased.

Target recently added Pacifica Suncare, a line of sunscreens, face shades, bronzers and balms that retail for less than $16. The line is 100% vegan, free of animal ingredients and not tested on animals.

To help demystify sun care, Bayer, the maker of Coppertone, commissioned an independent assessment from AccountAbility to offer consumers more confidence when choosing a sunscreen. “Consumers are receiving information about sun protection from a variety of often contradictory sources. … They want assurance that product performance claims are based on legitimate scientific testing,” said Michael Tune, VP of Bayer’s personal care development center. “As a leader in the U.S. sun care industry, we wanted to utilize our long-standing leadership to meet the changing expectations of consumers by voluntarily conducting — and sharing — this independent assurance assessment.”

Furthermore, Coppertone took some direction from consumers in developing its Clearly Sheer Whipped Sunscreen in SPF 30 and 50, as well as an SPF 50 version of Water Babies. And Coppertone’s new social media campaign, #ProtectMy, encourages people to use the hashtag to show how they use sunscreen. Coppertone will feature some of the content on its social platforms.

Edgewell is using social media to help highlight their new Hawaiian Tropic products. The Silk Hydration Weightless line features breathable, clear sprays in SPF 15 and SPF 30, as well as an SPF 30 face lotion offering 12 hours of hydration without clogging pores, the company said. Edgewell is working with YouTube personalities Bethany Mota, Megan Nicole and Claudia Sulewski on videos showing how they use the products. Also new from Edgewell are Banana Boat Dry Balance Sunscreen Lotion and Clear UltraMist, and Banana Boat Kids Sport Sunscreen Lotion and Lotion Spray with PowerStay Technology.

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Therapeutic, purpose-driven products drive bath boom

BY DSN STAFF

Adult bath products offering a Zen-like experience are bubbling to the surface in mass stores and helping to perk up sales, along with Epsom salt soaks. Consumers are favoring products with a purpose over simply fragrant bath additives. That explains the 26% climb in volume of Dr. Teal’s, which offers a Pure Epsom Salt Soak, along with body wash and foaming bath. It is the No.1 selling SKU in the bath category.

Aromatherapy is booming in bath, with Village Naturals Aromatherapy posting almost 400% sales gains. Sales of Me Bath!, which checks all of the boxes for what consumers want — no animal testing or parabens, vegan and made in the United States — soared 252%, according to IRI. Me Bath! is sold at Target, Walgreens, CVS and Amazon.

To read about how natural products are taking over beauty and skin care, click here.

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