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Iced coffee at its ‘Best’

BY DSN STAFF

SEATTLE —The ready-to-drink coffee segment has another player: Seattle’s Best Coffee. Starbucks and Pepsi-Cola North America Beverages’ North American Coffee Partnership introduced iced latte coffee drinks under the Seattle’s Best name in test markets in the western United States in January.

The beverages are available in iced latte, iced vanilla latte and iced mocha flavors, and retail for $1.49 for a single-serve can and $4.99 for a four-pack. The new line of drinks is being tested in such chains as Ralphs, Safeway, Target and Walgreens in Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon and Washington. A wider rollout is expected later this year.

Sales of ready-to-drink coffee were nearly $46 million in drug stores for the 52 weeks ended Dec. 27, 2009, according to Information Resources Inc.

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Sprite hopes to ‘spark’ creativity in teens

BY Allison Cerra

ATLANTA Sprite is giving teens a platform to express their creativity through music and film in the brand’s first-ever global integrated marketing campaign, The Spark.

“Our research shows that fresh ideas and experiences are important social currency for teens,” said Joe Tripodi, chief marketing and commercial officer, Coca-Cola. “Whether its music, film or sport, through The Spark campaign Sprite is providing an original, interactive way for teens around the world to showcase and share their creativity with others.”

The Spark takes its name from Sprite’s newly updated Spark logo, which captures the lemon-lime sparkling beverage’s unique ability to refresh and invigorate. The campaign will launch in markets around the world in 2010 and across four continents including Europe, North America, Africa and Asia. North America will lead the global launch with a campaign that embodies the essence of The Spark.

The new campaign is a fully integrated marketing effort that includes TV, out-of-home, digital and mobile applications.

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New report notes increased digital coupon activity by CPG manufacturers

BY Allison Cerra

MINNEAPOLIS Digital coupon distribution by consumer packaged goods manufacturers increased by 3.4% during fourth quarter 2009, across the Web sites monitored as part of the Marx Digital ProMotion Report available exclusively from Marx, a Kantar Media solution.

Of the 152 CPG manufacturers that issued coupons in the quarter, 116 CPG manufacturers distributed digital coupons across the retailer Web sites.  Twenty-six of these 116 manufacturers distributed digital coupons on two or more retailer Web sites, while 11 manufacturers were active across three or more retailer Web sites. In many situations the manufacturers that were active on print-at-home or e-coupon Web sites were also active on retailer Web sites.

“Digital coupons represent a small but growing percentage of total coupon distribution and are gaining traction across an expanding group of CPG manufacturers,” said Mark Nesbitt, Kantar Media president.

Additionally, the average face value per unit increased in 8-out-of-9 major CPG categories which included cereal, dry grocery, frozen products, health care, household products, other packaged goods (i.e. seasonal items), personal care, refrigerated foods and shelf stable beverages. Of the categories, other packaged goods, shelf stable beverages and personal care categories had the greatest increases in average face value per unit of 250%, 44.7% and 30.2%, respectively. Refrigerated foods was the only area with a decrease, declining 22.4%, versus the year-ago period, to 45 cents.

“Coupons are a proven tactic for creating purchase intent and driving planned shopping trips,” said Bob Cristofono, Marx VP sales. “Manufacturers and retailers are developing new ways to engage with consumer and shoppers through multiple platforms including retailer Web sites.”

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