HEALTH

Report: Standards for glucose monitors may change

BY DSN STAFF

NEW YORK The name of the game in diabetes management is compliance. For patients and their healthcare advocates/practitioners, compliance translates into better health outcomes that will prove to be considerably less costly over the life of the patient. And for retailers and blood-glucose meter manufacturers, compliance translates into a high-frequency/high-marketbasket consumer as compared with the average pharmacy patron.

 

So an article in The New York Times questioning the validity of meters sold in the United States could be cause for considerable concern — if American diabetics have less faith in the accuracy of their meters, then they’re likely to be less compliant in testing. And diabetics who don’t have their blood-sugar levels in check would mean poorer health, higher healthcare costs, a decline in pharmacy trips and the loss of that highly-coveted diabetes consumer.

 

As expressed in the Times report, creating a lack of faith in meter results by questioning meter efficacy is what the agency is attempting to avoid.

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HEALTH

HHS purchases 195 million doses of H1N1 vaccine

BY Alaric DeArment

NEW YORK Nearly 200 million doses of vaccine for novel A(H1N1) influenza could become available by this fall, according to published reports.

Reuters quoted a Department of Health and Human Services official as saying that the government had bought 195 million doses of vaccine. The U.S. population is approximately 300 million.

Since the flu strain appeared earlier this year, the World Health Organization has declared it a pandemic. Many health experts fear that if left unchecked, it could spark a devastating pandemic reminiscent of the 1918 Spanish flu, though that flu caused millions of deaths worldwide in part due to lack of medical technologies such as antiviral drugs.

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Diabetes educators get first taste of Nevella with Probiotics

BY Allison Cerra

INDIANAPOLIS Designed to boost the immune system and promote health, probiotics are gaining popularity at the grocery, and Nevella with Probiotics, made by Heartland Sweeteners, is the first and only such sweetener currently on the market. Diabetes educators will get an early preview of Nevella with Probiotics at their annual conference in Atlanta in early August, immediately prior to widespread availability across the country.

“We wanted to give the American Association of Diabetes Educators a first look at Nevella with Probiotics, since people with diabetes know the importance of maintaining a healthy weight and controlling blood sugar, and no-calorie sweeteners can help with that,” said Mike Servie, president Heartland Sweeteners. “Probiotics also show promise for enhancing the immune system, which is important for those with Type 1 diabetes.”

Unlike other foods enhanced with probiotics, the GanedenBC30 probiotic used in Nevella is shelf stable, and survives the digestive process to arrive in your gut where you need it. A single sachet of Nevella with Probiotics delivers greater efficacy than most other probiotics, including a cup of yogurt. Ganeden BC30 withstands baking temperatures better than other probiotics, so now consumers can add probiotic benefits to their favorite baked goods.

Nevella with Probiotics is available in 50-count, 100-count and 200-count packets, as well as 9.7-ounce recloseable bags perfect for baking. Major retailers such as Food Lion, A&P, Bi-Lo, HEB, Piggly Wiggly, Meijer and Dollar General will stock the sweetener beginning in late August.

KelloggsDRSNhttp://www.centerstoregrowth.com

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