HEALTH

Hyland’s launches Web site for Latina mothers

BY DSN STAFF

NEW YORK This is target marketing at its finest; not only are Hispanics more likely to embrace homeopathy, but baby care as a category resonates extremely well among Hispanics. And in it’s a format that will appeal to today’s new mothers — multi-cultural women who have embraced the Internet.

 

According to a Pew Hispanic Center report, 78% of Latinos who are English-dominant and 76% of bilingual Latinos use the Internet, compared with 32% of Spanish-dominant Hispanic adults.

 

And according to an Information Resources Inc. report published last year, that U.S. Hispanic market of more than 45 million consumers drove $34 billion in spending in 2008 and it’s a demographic that will spend an estimated $52 billion by 2015; and spending per household among Hispanic consumers significantly outpaces the national spending averages across nearly every channel.

Nearly one in four babies born in the United States are of Hispanic origin. And Hyland’s isn’t alone in recognizing this targeted-market-within-a-target-market opportunity. Johnson & Johnson’s parenting web site BabyCenter last year launched a Spanish-language version, Baby Center en Espanol. And Procter & Gamble, one of the larger advertisers in Spanish magazines allocated nearly $1 million of its ad-spend Pampers Swaddlers, specifically against Spanish  mothers in 2007, IRI reported.

In addition to being a particularly strong target market for baby care, other strong market opportunities include beauty care, laundry care and food and beverages that are youth-oriented, offer specific health benefits (eg. low sugar, high fiber) or are an ingredient or component of ethnic meals, the IRI research revealed.

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Pepcid better than Prilosec when taken with low-dose aspirin, trial finds

BY Michael Johnsen

NEW YORK The FAMOUS trial, reported in an article in Online First and in an upcoming edition of The Lancet, has found that Pepcid (famotidine) is effective in the prevention of stomach and upper intestinal ulcers, and damage to the gullet, The Lancet noted in a press statement earlier this week.

Low-dose aspirin (75mg to 325mg) is one of the most widely used drugs in the world. Increasingly, it is being bought over the counter or prescribed for its anti-clotting activity in the heart and brain, and in patients with diabetes. Despite the benefits of aspirin use, its rise has been accompanied by a rise in gastrointestinal complications, such as peptic ulcer bleeding, perforation and sometimes death. Such proton-pump inhibitors as Prilosec OTC (omeprazole) can prevent such ulcers but there have been concerns about cost, safety and risk of interaction with clopidogrel, another anti-clotting drug that is prescribed often with aspirin.

In the FAMOUS trial, researchers studied the effect of famotidine, which has a different mechanism of action to PPIs and belongs to a group of drugs called H2-receptor antagonists. The researchers found that stomach ulcers had developed in 3% of patients given famotidine compared with 15% given placebo. Upper-intestinal or duodenal ulcers were found in just one patient (0.5%) in the famotidine group compared with 17% of those given placebo. Gullet ulcers occurred in 4% of famotidine patients compared with 19% of placebo patients. And there were fewer adverse events in the famotidine group (9 vs. 15 placebo).

“Famotidine is effective in the prevention of gastric and duodenal ulcers, and erosive oesophagitis in patients taking low-dose aspirin,” concluded lead author Ali Taha, Crosshouse Hospital, Kilmarnock, England. “There is little doubt that aspirin and other anti-clotting drugs are very useful in the prevention of heart, brain and other vascular diseases, hence their increasing use world-wide. Patients on such drugs should continue using them as advised by their family doctors or hospital specialists. However, everybody should be aware that aspirin use can also be associated with a variety of gastrointestinal or digestive system problems, which sometimes can be serious. The results of this research widen the options for the prevention of such problems particularly when more than one clotting drug is required.”

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Take Care: Patients that use workplace primary care, pharmacy services have higher adherence rates

BY DSN STAFF

NEW YORK The findings of the Take Care Health Systems’ survey are important as they undoubtedly underscore the importance of worksite clinics, which are growing increasingly common as U.S. employers look for ways to curb skyrocketing healthcare costs and bolster employee health and productivity.

 

The study highlights what clinic operators — like Take Care Health Systems with its 300-plus worksite clinics — have known for some time: investing in integrated workplace health and pharmacy programs can, in fact, help employers realize healthcare savings, while improving patient outcomes.

 

 

What is the cost savings? As reported in late 2008 by Drug Store News, an August 2008 report by human resources consulting and outsourcing services provider Hewitt Associates, dubbed “Trends in HR and Employee Benefits: Employers Implement On-Site Health Clinics to Manage Costs,” states that some studies suggest that worksite clinics lead to $2 in savings for every $1 invested, and some may even reach $3 to $6 in savings for every $1 invested. Citing data provided by On-Site Health Care, the Hewitt Associates report also states, “For prescription drugs, employers may see 11.9% in brand savings and 56.3% in generic savings.” Then, of course, there’s the issue of medication adherence, which the Take Care Health Systems’ survey clearly addresses. With an estimated price tag of $100 billion, non-adherence is a major drain on the U.S. healthcare system.

 

 

Given the results of this study and the trends that are already taking place throughout the convenient care industry, employer-based clinics are something the industry is bound to see on the upswing. In fact, industry sources have suggested that the market could bear as many as 5,000 worksite clinics as the ideal client is an employer with 1,000 or more employees at a site.

 

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