HEALTH

Congress targets crime against retailers with ‘Protect Your Pharmacy Week’

BY Drug Store News Team

NEW YORK The fact that Congress stepped up to designate the week of April 13 as “Protect Your Pharmacy Week” is important as it further acknowledges and supports the fight against the growing problem of crime against retailers.

 

As stated in the article, the concept of “Protect Your Pharmacy Week” was created last year to encourage pharmacists to protect themselves, staff and patients against pharmacy crime, including prescription drug theft. New for this year is the Protect Your Pharmacy Now! Prescription Disposal Program, which offers information and resources for pharmacies to create consumer drug disposal programs to help their patients safely dispose of unused and expired medicines that may be dangerous to others and to the environment.

 

 

The news came on the heels of a letter sent by Steve Anderson, NACDS president and CEO, to Reps. Brad Ellsworth, D-Ind., and Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, praising the introduction of the Organized Retail Crime Act of 2009. This bill would define organized crime, expand fraud to include the illegal use of gift cards, UPC labels or RFID and requests that the United States Sentencing Commission review and amend the sentencing guidelines for convicted offenders.

 

 

The NACDS has stated that organized retail crime is responsible for more than $30 billion in losses annually, resulting in increased costs for merchants, higher prices for consumers, and lost tax revenue for state and local governments. In addition to increased costs faced by retailers to cover losses and investment of additional security measures, consumers are placed at risk when tampering occurs on such health care products as infant formula and OTC medications.

 

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FMI to present recession spending trends report at conference

BY Michael Johnsen

ARLINGTON, Va. The Food Marketing Institute will release its latest research on how the recession impacts consumer shopping at the supermarket and how that behavior affects retailer sales and operations at the FMI Future Connect conference in Dallas, the association announced Wednesday.

Today’s consumer is enormously focused on price and value, FMI stated. The Trends 2009 report provides insights into the extent this new thriftiness is impacting grocery shopping, trip frequency and spending. The survey covers money-saving measures in great depth including a wide range of measures both pre-trip and in the store.

Many also fear the negative impact of the recession on health and wellness. Trends will address shoppers’ interest in products that promote good health and nutrition and the extent to which they are succeeding in eating healthfully.

The food recalls of the past year have tested consumer confidence in the nation’s food supply. FMI research will show whether consumers think the food they buy in supermarkets and restaurants is safe and whom they trust to sell safe products.

The Speaks report will detail sales, same-store sales and profits for the retail food industry and feature an in-depth analysis of profit leaders. Speaks will provide retailer insights about private brands and the advertising changes they are making due to the recession.

Speaks will also look at the sustainability strategies retailers are putting in place and how they are incorporating health and wellness initiatives throughout the store.FMI’s U.S. Grocery Shopper Trends 2009 and The Food Retailing Industry Speaks 2009, two reports on consumer trends and retailer insights, will be presented by FMI president and CEO Leslie Sarasin, during a special session at Future Connect, The Food Retailing Industry Speaks, on May 4 at 1:15 p.m.

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Johnson & Johnson shifts acquisitions into consumer division

BY Michael Johnsen

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. Johnson & Johnson has decided to fold a pair of acquisitions made in November, HealthMedia and Human Performance Institute, into its existing consumer division as opposed to creating a separate “wellness” division, The Wall Street Journal reported Wednesday.

Both companies work to improve employee productivity or lifestyle health habits.

Earlier last year, J&J CEO William Weldon had suggested a wellness division might grow into a $20 billion annual business for the company.

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