News

Weis expands cheaper generics program

BY Michael Johnsen

SUNBURY, Pa. Weis Markets on Thursday added 50 generic prescription drugs and antibiotics to its 90-day, $9.99 prescription plan, expanding the program’s overall total to more than 400 medications.

“With the tough economy, increasing unemployment rates and record low consumer confidence, our challenge is to offer our customers long-term savings to complement our weekly promotions,” stated David Hepfinger, Weis Markets president and CEO. “In January, we introduced our 90-day Price Freeze program, which freezes the prices of 2,400 staple items through April 1 and now we’re expanding our 90-Day, $9.99 Generic Prescription plan to give our customers more choices and to help them save money on their prescriptions. … In 2008, our generic prescription plan has helped our customers and their prescription benefit plans save more than $2 million and they will save even more money in 2009.”

“Our 90-day, $9.99 generic prescription plan offers our customers competitive prices which are quite often lower than their mail-order co-pay in a full-service pharmacy that also offers medication management and counseling services,” Hepfinger said. “Ultimately, our plan offers both savings and service along with increased choices, which are increasingly important to many of our customers.”

New additions to the 90-day, $9.99 plan include generic drugs and antibiotics used to treat high blood pressure, arthritis, ulcers, sinus infections and strep throat. The plan continues to include generic drugs and antibiotics used to treat allergies, asthma, arthritis, cholesterol, diabetes, infections and digestive ailments and the new generic drug Altace, which is used to treat high blood pressure and heart failure.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

News

Study shows quick workouts help improve insulin sensitivity

BY Michael Johnsen

LONDON A study published earlier this week in the online journal BMC Endocrine Disorders found that less than eight minutes per week of high-intensity exercise substantially improved insulin sensitivity in healthy, sedentary people.

The study involved 16 young men who performed two weeks of high-intensity interval training. Study participants were given an oral glucose test before and after the two-week training period. In the later test, the amount of time the men’s blood sugar and blood insulin levels were above normal was reduced by 12% and 37%, respectively.

“This novel time-efficient training paradigm can be used as a strategy to reduce metabolic risk factors in young and middle aged sedentary populations who otherwise would not adhere to time consuming traditional aerobic exercise regimes,” the authors concluded.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

News

CDC: Young people face multiple health challenges

BY Alaric DeArment

ATLANTA Increases in obesity, higher injury rates and lack of health insurance are just three of the challenges that young adults aged 18 to 29 in the United States face, according to a new report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The report, “Health, United States: 2008,” is the 32nd edition of the annual report, prepared by the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics. 

Highlights of the report, which includes a special section on young adults, include: 

  • Obesity rates have tripled, to 24%, between the periods between the early 1970s and 2006
  • Smoking rates among young women declined between 1997 and 2006 by nearly 20%, but not among young men; in 2006, 29% of young men were smokers
  • In 2005, accidental injuries, homicide and suicide accounted for 70% of deaths among young adults
  • Between 1999 and 2004, nearly 9% of those aged 20 to 29 reported depression, anxiety disorder or panic disorder in the past 12 months
  • In 2006, 34% of those aged 20 to 24 lacked insurance, compared to 21% of 18- and 19-year-olds and 29% of those aged 25 to 29
  • Between 2004 and 2006, 17% of those in the 18-29 group reported needing but not receiving medical care, prescription medicines, mental health care or eyeglasses due to lack of money

The report also revealed a number of trends among older adults. 

  • In 2006, life expectancies for men and women were 3.6 years and 1.9 years higher than in 1990, respectively, due to declines in death rates from heart disease, stroke and cancer
  • Between 2003 and 2006, 65% of men and 80% of women 75 and older had high blood pressure or were taking medication to treat it, compared to 36% of adults aged 45 to 54
  • Increased use of cholesterol-lowering drugs had partially contributed to a decline in the percentage of the population with high cholesterol
  • About 25% of adults 60 and older had diabetes between 2003 and 2006
  • Obesity rates remain high, but are not increasing as rapidly as before; more than a third of adults 20 and older were obese in 2005 and 2006

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES