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Walgreens’ social media director heads to Campbell’s

BY Allison Cerra

CAMDEN, N.J. — Campbell’s has tapped Walgreens’ social media director to lead the soup maker’s digital marketing and social media efforts.

Campbell’s on Thursday said Adam Kmiec will serve as director of digital marketing and social media, responsible for leading a global digital marketing and social media strategy that encompasses both consumer-facing communications and corporate initiatives. As part of his role, Kmiec will work closely with global communications, consumer affairs, investor relations, public affairs and corporate responsibility functions and business unit marketing, teams and will report to Andrew Brennan, Campbell’s VP global strategy, advertising and design, the company said.

“Adam brings a great deal of experience to Campbell, including a broad marketing background and a specific expertise in digital and social media," Brennan said. "Throughout his career, Adam has helped a variety of consumer brands establish and expand their digital marketing efforts, and I am confident that he will help Campbell do the same. A major focus of our growth strategy is to strengthen our brand and product equities by connecting with new consumers in new ways. Adam will play an important role in this effort.”

Prior to joining Campbell’s, Kmiec served as director of social media at Walgreens and established programs that helped advance the drug store chain’s digital marketing efforts. He also was responsible for implementing and overseeing social media policies and governance across Walgreens corporate communications and its nearly 8,000 retail locations, including the use of social media tools for employee communications. Prior to that, he worked at MARC USA as SVP interactive marketing innovation.

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New, not too sweet 
tea hits shelves

BY Barbara White-Sax

ATLANTA — Coca-Cola’s Honest Tea brand began the rollout of its Not Too Sweet Tea, a traditional sweet tea with 40% less sugar and calories than the leading sweet teas. The new addition to Honest Tea’s lineup is brewed with organic black tea leaves and is sweetened with “just a tad” (25 g) of organic cane sugar and organic stevia. Each 16.9-fl.-oz. bottle contains 100 calories, compared with leading brands of sweet tea, which contain an average of 43 g of sugar and 174 calories per 16.9-fl.-oz. bottle. Like other products under the Honest Tea brand, Not Too Sweet Tea is USDA-certified organic and fair-trade-certified. It has a suggested retail price of $1.49.

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National Consumers League to FDA: NuVal can mislead consumers

BY Allison Cerra

WASHINGTON — A consumer group is urging the Food and Drug Administration to review a proprietary point-of-purchase nutrition rating system that it said is "inconsistent with FDA guidance statements and enforcement correspondence, federal nutrition programs and recommendations from the Institute of Medicine."

In a letter sent to FDA commissioner Margaret Hamburg, the National Consumers League told the government agency that such products as snack chips and frozen dessert concoctions receive a higher rating than canned fruit. Canned fruit, NCL said, is considered a "fruit" under the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National School Lunch Program regulations. What’s more, NCL said, NuVal’s proprietary algorithm should be brought into question because it violates the second phase of an IOM report that states that all nutrition rating systems should be based on nonproprietary algorithms that can be fully evaluated by the scientific community. "Given the inconsistent scores awarded to various foods [under the NuVal system], NuVal’s proprietary algorithm be open to scrutiny," NCL said.

NuVal is a joint venture formed in 2008 by Topco Associates and Griffin Hospital of Derby, Conn., a nonprofit community hospital. It debuted in major U.S. retail chains in 2008 and since has been implemented at such stores as Kroger, Meijer, Price Chopper, Hy-Vee, Giant Eagle and King Kullen, among others.

"The stark shortcomings of NuVal underscore the need for FDA to promptly notify grocery store and supermarket chains, warning retailers against the use of propriety nutrition rating systems that are in conflict with FDA’s guidance statement, enforcement letter, federal nutrition programs and recommendations of the IOM," NCL said.

Click here to view the letter.

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