BEAUTY CARE

Vegan beauty goes mainstream

BY Lonni Delane

For all the clamor and controversy over being “cruelty-free,” little attention is paid to the animal derivatives used in the products themselves. There is a small but growing band of thought leaders — brands, bloggers and activists — who are determined to raise awareness and create a market for those who want to lessen the environmental impact of animal agriculture by offering vegan beauty products.

However, this message is not resonating with consumers yet. In a survey conducted by Statista, “vegan” ranked as one of the lowest concerns (6%) among features valued by consumers using organic personal care products. However, “environmentally friendly” and “made from natural sources” ranked very high. So, it seems that the issue lies in communicating actionable goals rather than abstract concepts.

According to Mintel’s 2017 report, “Farm to Face Makes a Good Ethical Message,” consumers want to connect with the source of their skin and beauty care. Whole Foods is one retailer on the ground floor of this trend. They employ strict standards for their beauty and skin care brands and they seek out brands with vegan offerings.

100% Pure, a pioneering brand for vegan beauty, is embracing the environmental aspects of veganism, but pushing for scientific breakthroughs. Founder and chief of creative Susie Wang told Drug Store News, “One of the crowning jewels in our natural repertoire is our fruit pigments. We dehydrate fresh fruits and vegetables and then extract their natural, intensely vibrant pigments.”

Balanced Guru, a certified-organic brand that is vegan except for organic beeswax, has created an alternative to silicone for their hair oils. Brand director Juan Pinto said, “With our oils, you get the immediate benefits of frizz control, softness and shine, while you also get long-term benefits of healthier hair.”

Skinfix has brought vegan branding to mass market retail with a dermatologist-approved line of skin care products that are all vegan, except for ethically sourced beeswax.

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Non-touring: Highlighter trend takes over

BY Lonni Delane

YouTube beauty came on the scene and gave women a free-and-easy education for their beauty routines. But, with Instagramming and tutorials, it became too much for the average woman balancing a hectic schedule. According to Mintel’s new report, “2017: Back to Basics,” the industry is starting to see a backlash to heavy Instagram-style makeup. Sixty-nine percent of women spend 20 minutes or less on makeup each day, and consumers are looking for achievable beauty. Enter non-touring.

James Vincent, director of artistry and education for The Makeup Show, described the concept as “a flush of color and a wearable glow.” Vincent said artists and high-end brands are driving the trend, opting to go “back to basics.”

There’s no denying that highlighters are trending, with highlight/contour products reaching $40.5 million in sales, an increase of 149% over last year, according to Nielsen data for the period ending May 20. A consumer study from TABS Analytics revealed that highlighters have a 19% household penetration.

Part of what makes highlighting such a hot trend is its versatility. Women can choose a glow that is tailored to their needs and tastes. NYX and Wet N Wild have had success with their highlighter products, and NYX recently launched their Dose of Dew stick. The Dose of Dew Stick is a face gloss in stick form with a subtle champagne base that works with any skin tone.

Wet N Wild’s new MegaGlo Highlighting Powders were a massive hit, almost doubling their sales in the category over the same period last year, according to Nielsen data. The $4.99 price point doesn’t hurt.

Aminata Tall, senior communications director for Markwins Beauty, told Drug Store News the brand’s new highlighting powders were more popular than they expected. “The MegaGlo Highlighting Powders were slated to be limited editions only. However, when we launched them last summer, they instantly became a huge hit, both online and in-store,” Tall said. The brand now is making the highlighting powders permanent, along with the release of four new shades.

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5 hot products from the robust offerings at CosmoProf North America

BY DSN STAFF

Cosmoprof North America, or CPNA, delivered a robust beauty trade fair featuring resources for every aspect of business, from packaging and filling to finished product. The event, held July 9 to July 12 in Las Vegas at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center, grew this year in both attendance and square footage, which can be attributed to expansion in such specialized areas as scent, natural products and multicultural items, not to mention a multitude of country pavilions — with Korean beauty holding court in two areas.

“Two years ago, some said it would be difficult to grow, but in reality it is exactly what we have done,” said Roberto Kerkoc, VP of Bologna Fiere Group, which organizes all the events of the Cosmoprof Worldwide network.

This year’s event attracted 36,787 attendees and 1,278 exhibitors, each up 9% from 2016. Square footage dedicated to the show floor increased 4% over the previous year, to 293,306 sq. ft.

Despite the potential to feature more exhibitors by moving to another venue, Kerkoc said currently that isn’t a concern.

“Our mission is not to sell square footage. It is to sell an experience,” Kerkoc said, adding that moving halls would likely jeopardize the high-end experience offered at the current property. That experience includes some of beauty’s most sought-after buyers, including HSN, Barneys New York, Kohl’s, Dermstore, Amazon and QVC, the latter of which will feature a special show in 2018 based on CPNA discoveries.

Not to miss out on the power of social media, CPNA increased the span of its popular influencer programs and recruited 17 highly connected beauty influencers to engage with exhibitors on the show floor, specifically in the designated Beauty-E Zone, where brands could seek their advice.

Indie beauty brands perhaps had the most to realize at CPNA, with many business solutions offered to them during the three-day event. Educational sessions took center stage, with topics ranging from “How to Market to Millennials” and “Best Tech Practices to Connect with Beauty Consumers” to “How to Take Your Business to the Next Level with Financial Investment.”

And Cosmoprof delivered the best in beauty products. Here are the top five products and companies Drug Store News saw at the show.

Saryna Key
From the founder of uber-famous Moroccan Oil hair care brand comes Saryna Key, a line that’s positioning itself against its hero ingredient, shea butter, which the company is importing from Africa to Israel, where the product is ultimately made. Sold in 11 countries worldwide and with limited distribution in smaller U.S. markets, Saryna Key is making its big push in the United States this year. Four lines comprise the brand, including Damage Repair, Curl Control, Volume Lift and Color Lasting, each containing a shampoo, conditioner, spray gloss, shea oil and leave-in moisturizer.

Skin79
Deep in the heart of the Korean pavilion was Skin79, a K-beauty company offering beauty products for every price point and consumer. For millennials — and even younger beauty consumers — Skin79 featured animal-shaped fruit acid masks based on popular Snapchat filters. A face mask resembling a panda, a cat, a monkey and a mouse looked to be effective and instantly Instagram-ready.

BB creams were available for more serious beauty users, including Golden Snail Intensive BB Cream, comprised of 45% snail extract to moisturize, smooth and brighten skin. Other items included cushion compacts, CC creams and Jeju Aloe products, utilizing Korea’s famous tea.

Derma Pure Clinic Skin Iron
The Skin Iron, also found in the Korean pavilion, was designed to stimulate skin with microcurrents, sound wave vibration and heat. This all-in-one beauty device can be used for double chin lifting, nasolabial fold improvement and smoothing out facial contours. The device heats to 107 degrees Fahrenheit, too.

Dermelect Cosmeceuticals
Brows remained a focal point for beauty brands, with Dermelect offering up some unique solutions. Their Revitalite Brow Transformer looks to be an easy brow-filling technique to address sparse areas, while Revitalite Brow Lift redefines falling arches by adding concealing strokes of matte and pearlescence.

Zoya Art of Beauty
This family-owned and operated nail color brand now boasts 40% of its business internationally, with the balance generated in the United States through more than 6,200 salons, as well as Ulta Beauty stores. Launched in 1993 as a salon in Cleveland, Ohio, the company is being eyed by investors, but the family remains firm in its indie roots. Zoya recently bought an 80,000-sq.-ft. facility, in which it manufactures, fills and houses a creative studio for its 10-free formulas. A host of items are due for the second half of the year, including six new lip shades; duo, trio and quad-nail gift sets; and a hyaluronic acid-based hand lotion.

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