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United, Associated become American Associated Pharmacies

BY DSN STAFF

SCOTTSBORO, Ala —United Drugs and Associated Pharmacies doubled their respective sizes in September 2009 when they completed their collective merger to form American Associated Pharmacies.

Since the merger, the two companies have continued operating under their own names, despite their common corporate umbrella, appointing Jon Copeland as president and CEO of the combined company, while United Drugs CEO Bruce Semingson has assumed the role of COO.

AAP now has independent pharmacies in its network spread across every state except North Dakota. One reason for the merger was that API had a warehouse while United Drugs did not, but the cooperatively owned warehouse now can provide discounts on selected branded, generic and over-the-counter drugs for 2,000 pharmacies. In addition, members have access to the latest technological advances in pharmacy, political advocacy and a resource for education on the latest pharmacy trends and information, such as guidance on average wholesale price issues and how to avoid a pharmacy benefit manager audit for Medicare Part D claims.

In January, AAP made a deal with Cardinal Health that would make Cardinal the exclusive pharmaceutical distributor for its stores nationwide, though Cardinal previously had signed separate exclusive distribution agreements with API and United Drugs, before the merger. The new deal, which began Jan. 1, solidified the partnership.

“Since API and United Drugs joined together in September [2009], we have been very active restablishing our new parent company, AAP, while also focusing on ways to strengthen our well-established relationships with Cardinal Health,” Copeland said. “Throughout the entire process, we’ve had only one goal: the greater success of our members. Now, with AAP’s new agreement with Cardinal Health, we’ve made a giant step toward achieving that goal.”

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Survey finds shoppers with a plan spend most money

BY Allison Cerra

CHICAGO Coupon clippers and shoppers that plan their excursions to the supermarket are more likely to spend more money, according to a Henkel survey.

Henkel, a manufacturer of such brands as Dial soap, said that those who go to supermarkets with the intent to shop and save yield more profit than carefree shoppers. On average, coupon clippers spent more than $7,100 last year. What’s more, Henkel added, these shoppers accounted for 31% of spending on packaged goods in 2009, even though they only make up 26% of U.S. households.

Another interesting fact, the CPG maker noted, is that shoppers with a plan also are less likely to shop at new stores.

The survey was baed on tracking of about 40,000 households performed by ACNielsen and Information Resources Inc.

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Bayer aspirin quick release crystals

BY Michael Johnsen

CVS had this citrus-flavored Bayer aspirin quick release crystals clip-stripped within adult dentures. And while this product isn’t the 81 mg of aspirin recommended for daily consumption to prevent a second heart attack (it contains 850 mg in each powder pouch), there is still a very strong need for this kind of easily stored/quickly administered aspirin product for seniors.

Sufferers of any heart attack are recommended to chew and swallow aspirin just after they’ve dialed 911 and called for help. As the first aid for heart attacks, aspirin makes platelets less sticky and can minimize blood clot formation and prevent further blockage of the artery.

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