HEALTH

Type 2 diabetes linked with cognitive impairments, study shows

BY Allison Cerra

WASHINGTON A small study conducted by Canadian researchers found factors that may link Type 2 diabetes with such cognitive impairments as dementia.

Older adults with diabetes who also have high blood pressure, walk slowly or lose their balance, or believe they’re in bad health, are more likely to have poorer cognitive functions than those without these problems, according to a new study conducted by researchers at the University of Alberta in Canada and published in the September issue of Neuropsychology

The study of older Canadians — 41 adults with Type 2 diabetes, ages 55 to 81 years, and 458 matched healthy controls (ages 53 to 90 years) — found that systolic blood pressure, a low combination score for gait and balance, and a patient’s own reports of poor health all played a statistically significant role in the relationship between diabetes and cognitive impairment.

“Awareness of the link between diabetes and cognition could help people realize how important it is to manage this disease, and to motivate them to do so,” said co-author Roger Dixon, PhD, of the University of Alberta.

Type 2 diabetes has been found by other researchers to nearly double the risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, said Dixon, who studies how health affects cognition in aging. As diabetes becomes more common, this heightened risk could dramatically hike the number of older people with dementia.

The prevalence of diabetes in the United States for people older than age 60 — according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases — is more than 23%, while Canadian prevalence is nearly 19%, according to the Public Health Agency of Canada.

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HEALTH

J&J launches Every Mother, Every Child

BY Allison Cerra

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. Johnson & Johnson is seeking to aid the health of women and children in developing countries with a new initiative.

J&J’s Every Mother, Every Child effort is supporting the United Nations’ effort to reduce mortality in women and children by 2015. The effort includes treatments for intestinal worms, health information for pregnant women over existing mobile phones, research and development of new medicines for HIV and tuberculosis, and efforts focused on enhancing birth safety and improving health.

 

“We have a responsibility to contribute to a future in which women and children have the latest knowledge, technology and medicines to support good health,” said Johnson & Johnson chairman and CEO William Weldon. “Johnson & Johnson has a long history of advancing care for women and children, and we’re pleased to continue that legacy with this commitment.”

 

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Many young women may be mistreating yeast infections, study finds

BY Michael Johnsen

SKILLMAN, N.J. According to a recent survey of women ages 18 to 24 years commissioned by the Monistat brand, 61% of young women are unsure about which, if any, over-the-counter products can cure a yeast infection.

 

"Many women don’t realize that once they’ve identified they have a yeast infection, they can easily treat it on their own terms," stated Suzanne Gilberg-Lenz, a board-certified OB/GYN who practices in Beverly Hills, Calif., and a partner in the Monistat survey.

 

 

The survey also found more than 36% of women incorrectly believe that treating the symptoms of a yeast infection is the same as curing the infection. And 38% of women mistakenly believe a yeast infection only can be cured by a doctor’s prescription. 

 

 

"The symptoms of a yeast infection vary greatly among individuals," Lenz said. "The classic symptoms … do not appear for all women. The important sign is always vaginal discomfort that develops out of the blue. If you are unsure, especially if you’ve never had a yeast infection, check with your doctor to make sure your symptoms aren’t actually the result of a sexually transmitted disease, bacterial infection or a combination of yeast and bacteria." 

 

 

"If your yeast infection does not clear up, contact your doctor," Lenz added. "Once you’ve treated the infection, long-term, preventative measures, including changes to your diet and lifestyle, can help prevent future infections."

 

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