HEALTH

Trigg Laboratories provides West Virginia restaurant owners an anniversary celebration

BY Michael Johnsen

VALENCIA, Calif. — Trigg Laboratories on Thursday announced they will help Sonny and Sharie Knight, owners of the Hillbilly Hot Dogs restaurant in West Virginia, celebrate 13 years of wedlock on Dec. 12. 

Featuring their brand Wet Personal Lubricants, Trigg Laboratories competed with many other candidates to host the 30th vow renewal for the couple. "Trigg Laboratories is so excited to host Sonny and Sharie as they renew their vow to love each other," stated Jennifer Martsolf, VP marketing at Trigg Laboratories. 

In addition to providing a specially appointed chapel for the ceremony, Trigg Laboratories will supply the couple with a full celebration at the company’s Valencia headquarters.

Sonny and Sharie Knight married and launched their restaurant, Hillbilly Hot Dogs, in 1999. The operation has two locations in West Virginia, was featured on Guy Fieri’s popular show "Diners, Drive-ins, and Dives" and is home to the infamous "Homewrecker," a 15-in. all-beef hot dog covered with sautéed peppers and onions, jalapenos, habanero sauce, nacho cheese, Sharie’s homemade chili sauce, mustard, coleslaw, lettuce, tomatoes and shredded cheese.

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GSK Consumer Healthcare hires Olympic gold medalist in cold sores campaign

BY Alaric DeArment

PARSIPPANY, N.J. — The consumer health division of GlaxoSmithKline has enlisted an Olympic gold medalist to educate the public about cold sores and promote its OTC cold sore treatment.

The company said Thursday that it had hired Misty May-Treanor, three-time gold medalist in beach volleyball, in a campaign to dispel myths about cold sores as the cold and flu season approaches. GlaxoSmithKline spokeswoman Pam Marquess noted that about 80 million Americans get cold sores, which are caused by a herpes virus related to the same ones that causes illnesses like chickenpox and mononucleosis.

"I’ve gotten cold sores for as long as I can remember, and they always seem to pop up at the worst possible time, and for me, that was right in the middle of the 2012 London Games," May-Treanor said. "I have been using Abreva for years, and I stick with it because it heals my cold sores fast."

According to a survey conducted for GlaxoSmithKline by Wakefield Research, 52% of respondents were unaware that cold sores go through multiple stages of development before beginning to heal, and half did not realize that if left untreated, they can take up to two weeks to heal.

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Study: Humidity may help explain seasonality of flu virus

BY Michael Johnsen

BLACKSBURG, Va. — Humidity may be the common denominator to help explain why flu viruses are most prevalent during the winter months in temperate climates like the United States, and most prevalent during the rainy season in many tropical regions close to the equator, according to a study released Tuesday by Virginia Tech researchers.

Possible explanations for the seasonality of the flu have been investigated in the past, such as the return of kids to school, people spending more time indoors in the winter and lower light levels that affect the immune system, but there has been no consensus among that research.

The Virginia Tech study presents for the first time the relationship between the influenza A virus viability in human mucus and humidity over a large range of relative humidities, from 17% to 100%. At low humidity, respiratory droplets evaporate completely and the virus survives well under dry conditions. But at moderate humidity, the droplets evaporate some, but not completely, leaving the virus exposed to higher levels of chemicals in the fluid and compromising the virus’ ability to infect cells.

Researchers found the viability of the flu A virus was highest when the relative humidity was either close to 100% or below 50%. “We added flu viruses to droplets of simulated respiratory fluid and to actual human mucus and then measured what fraction survived after exposure to low, medium, and high relative humidities,” stated Linsey Marr, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at Virginia Tech.

The viruses survived best at low humidity, such as those found indoors in the winter, and at extremely high humidity. Humidity affects the composition of the fluid, namely the concentrations of salts and proteins in respiratory droplets, and this affects the survival rates of the flu virus.

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