BEAUTY CARE

Too Faced Cosmetics launches Smurfette products

BY Antoinette Alexander

IRVINE, Calif. Attention Smurf fans: Too Faced Cosmetics has developed, through a license agreement with Sony Pictures Consumer Products and Lafig Belgium s.a., a limited-edition collection of Smurfette cosmetics.

The five-piece collection, debuting at Sephora U.S. stores in January, will bear the iconic Smurfette imagery. The collection is positioned to attract both the Smurfette and Too Faced loyal fan bases, as well as new shoppers.

Products include:

  • Smurfette Mood Swing Lip Gloss ($18.50): A mood-activated lip gloss that starts off Smurfy blue and then transforms into countless shades of Smurf-berry depending on the wearer’s emotional state.
  • So Smurfy Illuminating Face Powder ($26): Created in the image of Smurfette, this multi-shade palette brightens and tones with a combination of soft, color-correcting shades that blend together for wear on any skin tone.
  • So Smurfy Eye Shadow ($32.50): A chic palette that includes four complimentary eye shadow shades—two of which are debossed with the Smurf daisy and Smurfette’s silhouette.
  • Smurfy Eyed Liquid Liner ($17.50): Two liquid eyeliners in Smurf-inspired blue and white shades formulated with sparkling, micro-glitter for added impact.

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Boots and Sainsbury’s recall counterfeit Colgate toothpaste

BY Antoinette Alexander

LONDON British retailers Boots and Sainsbury’s have recalled thousands of tubes of counterfeit Colgate toothpaste.

According to published reports, the counterfeit products were labeled Colgate Cavity Protection and came in 100ml tubes. They were sold between Nov. 28 and Dec. 5.

While the retailers believe that the fake Colgate toothpastes do not represent a public-health risk, Sainsbury’s reportedly wrote to 17,000 customers and put recall notices in stores. The supermarket chain was unable to determine the precise number of counterfeit products sold because they became mixed in with genuine product.

Meanwhile, Boots reportedly contacted its customers who use loyalty cards and put notices up in stores. Boots has estimated that a maximum of 235 counterfeit tubes could have been sold but it believes the actual number to be far lower, according to published reports.

Last year in the United States, batches of fake Colgate were stripped from store shelves due to concerns that they may contain the chemical diethyleneglycol, which is an ingredient in anti-freeze.

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Allergen receives FDA approval for eyelash enhancement product

BY Antoinette Alexander

IRVINE, Calif. Pharmaceutical company Allergen has received Food and Drug Administration approval for a new prescription product that increases the length, thickness and darkness of eyelashes.

Latisse is a once-daily prescription treatment that is applied to the base of the upper eyelashes with a single-use-per-eye disposable applicator.

Users can expect to see longer, fuller and darker eyelashes in as little as eight weeks, with full results in 16 weeks. To maintain the effect, continued treatment with Latisse is required, according to the company. If a patient stops using the product, eyelashes will gradually return to where they were prior to treatment over a period of weeks to months.

The product will be available with a prescription only and is expected to launch nationwide in the first quarter of 2009. Allergen estimates global peak sales of Latisse could exceed $500 million a year.

Latisse was clinically tested in a Phase III, multi-center, double-masked, placebo-controlled study to assess its safety and efficacy. In addition, like Botox, which was first approved by the FDA as a medical treatment for eye disorders and was later found to have an aesthetic benefit, bimatoprost, the active ingredient in Latisse, was first approved in 2001 as a medical product to lower intraocular pressure in people with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. Patients treated with bimatoprost for this specific eye condition experienced eyelash growth as a side effect.

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