CENTER STORE

Tobacco sales being evaluated by Walgreens

BY Michael Johnsen

DEERFIELD, Ill. — In response to CVS Caremark’s announcement to pull tobacco products out of its stores, Walgreens stated that the category has been under review at its stores, too.

Walgreens has been evaluating its tobacco line for “some time,” and said it “will continue to evaluate the choice of products our customers want, while also helping to educate them and providing smoking cessation products and alternatives that help reduce the demand for tobacco products,” noted Michael Polzin, Walgreens spokesperson.

Walgreens has also announced a partnership with GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare to launch a free, Internet-based smoking cessation program called Sponsorship to Quit. The program will provide smokers with customized tools to track their progress in quitting smoking.

 

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

CENTER STORE

Sunsweet unveils latest treat

BY Ryan Chavis

YUBA CITY, Calif. — Sunsweet, a marketer of dried fruits and fruit juices, is introducing new Greek Style PlumSweets, which combines the chewy center of the company’s line of diced dried plums with a creamy Greek yogurt coating.

"Nearly one quarter of Americans report eating more Greek yogurt this year compared to last," Jeff McLemore, VP North America marketing for Sunsweet, said. "People are looking for their favorite brands to incorporate Greek yogurt into the foods they already love. We put a modern and healthier twist on Greek yogurt with Greek Style PlumSweets."

Greek Style PlumSweets are currently available in test markets in Northern California and the East Coast at retailers including A&P, Ahold, Giant Eagle and Raley’s.

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

CENTER STORE

FDA publishes interim final rule regarding infant formula

BY Michael Johnsen

SILVER SPRING, Md. — The Food and Drug Administration on Thursday published an interim final rule to further safeguard the health of infants fed infant formula in the United States. The rule, which sets standards for manufacturers to produce safe infant formula that supports healthy growth, is accompanied by two draft guidance documents for industry.

“Many families rely on infant formula as either the sole source of nutrition or an integral part of an infant’s diet through 12 months of age,” Michael Taylor, the FDA’s deputy commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine, said. “The FDA sets high quality standards for infant formulas because nutritional deficiencies during this critical time of development can have a significant impact on a child’s long-term health and well-being. This rule will help to prevent adulteration in infant formula and ensure infant formula supports normal, physical growth.”

While breastfeeding is strongly recommended and many mothers hope to breastfeed, only 75% of infants in the United States start out being breastfed. By age three months, two-thirds or 2.7 million U.S. infants rely on infant formula for some portion of their nutrition. The interim final rule applies only to infant formulas represented for use by healthy infants without unusual medical or dietary problems.

The interim final rule amends the FDA’s quality control procedures, notification, and record and reporting requirements for manufacturers of applicable infant formula products. The rule, in part, will ensure that infant formula contains all federally required nutrients. The interim final rule also establishes current good manufacturing practices specifically designed for infant formula, including required testing for microbial contamination. This microbial testing includes testing representative samples of finished products to prevent the distribution of infant formula products contaminated with the pathogens Cronobacter and Salmonella. The interim final rule also establishes quality factor requirements to support healthy growth.

Companies currently manufacturing infant formula in the United States already voluntarily conduct many of the current good manufacturing practices and quality control procedures included in the interim final rule. Following publication of the rule, the FDA will be accepting and reviewing comments on issues or information not previously considered. 

 

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES