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Tena improves incontinence line with new breathable technology

BY Michael Johnsen

Philadelphia-based Tena on Thursday announced its Premium Briefs, Protective Underwear and Heavy Pad incontinence products will now feature Tena ConfioAir 100% breathable technology, which allows excess moisture to evaporate, to help maintain skin's natural moisture balance and improve comfort for wearers.

"We look beyond the product to focus on the individuals, and are dedicated to finding new solutions that offer optimum fit and functionality while improving quality of care," stated Jessica Lan, director product management for Essity Health and Medical Solutions, North America, which manufactures the products. "With this upgrade to our absorbent line, we are pleased to provide more options that help maintain a care routine and lead to better skin health."

"Tena ConfioAir 100% breathable technology is unlike any other innovation in the field of adult incontinence," noted Tony Forsberg, national clinical director for Essity Health and Medical Solutions, North America. "While almost every other product has breathable materials from the front to back of the brief, with ConfioAir we can now keep moisture away from the skin and protect it with a whole vapor- and heat- permeable product."

Tena's ConfioAir technology features a unique outer layer with micro-pores that allows moisture from the inner absorbent core to evaporate. This helps maintain skin's natural moisture balance, allowing it to breathe and keeping the skin on the inside of the product comfortable and dry. This technology is now included across Tena's premium absorbent product line at no additional cost to the customer.

For the large population that suffers from incontinence, discomfort can happen quickly. Many incontinent individuals are elderly and have fragile skin that faces a variety of threats including skin ulcers, incontinence-associated dermatitis and infection as well as greater potential for injury as healing slows down. Recognizing that skin health is important for incontinent individuals, who are at risk of painful irritations from prolonged exposure to moisture, it is vital to provide comfort and care to the perineal area and support the overall quality of life for product users.

 

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Innovus launches low-cost nasal spray allergy relief in FlutiCare

BY Michael Johnsen

Earlier this month Innovus Pharmaceuticals launched FlutiCare OTC in the U.S., making it the third branded fluticasone propionate nasal spray on the market. Innovus, based in San Diego, secured distribution through more than 10,000 independent pharmacies through AmerisourceBergen and McKesson and Walmart online.

As a second phase of its launch, Innovus Pharma will launch FlutiCare to large retail stores.

FlutiCare will be available OTC with the same prescription strength and same delivery method as Flonase and ClariSpray. The company currently believes that FlutiCare will be the most affordable fluticasone propionate nasal spray on the market and is now available in one dose, a 30 Day (120 Sprays) treatment. Innovus is also offering a monthly autoship plan.

“We are very excited to launch FlutiCare OTC and provide all patients with allergy relief,” stated Bassam Damaj, president and CEO Innovus Pharma. “FlutiCare traces its roots as the most prescribed Rx 24-hour nasal allergy spray API and form in the U.S. over the past 7 years by a factor of over 10 to 1.”

FlutiCare becomes the company’s second available allergy relief product along with AllerVarx, a patented dietary supplement formulated to provide relief during the allergy season, already on the market.

In addition, the company, pending FDA’s guidance, plans to move forward with a fluticasone kit for nasal allergy containing FlutiCare and its upcoming saline nasal spray NasaVa.

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Rules of the Road: Learning from China’s trade structure

BY Ed Rowland

Jack Ma, the founder of Alibaba once said, “You should learn from your competitor, but never copy. Copy and you die.” As the Chinese consumer healthcare market continues to rocket forward, what can we learn from them?  For my dollar — or yuan — quite a bit.

In some ways, China is moving toward a U.S. trade structure although the emergence of traditional retail has been in the large shadow of e-commerce. Global powerhouses like Watson’s or Walmart have had different levels of success. Don’t underestimate some of the homegrown chains (Nepstar comes to mind) nor the uniqueness of the Chinese consumer. I am always amazed by the space allotted to traditional Chinese medicine vs. western brands. Chinese retail is deftly combining both. Their ability to readjust store space and globally source products is admirable. And who knew that Wisconsin produces some of the most prized ginseng? Ginseng-heads at a Green Bay Packers game doesn’t fit.

China also has forged a new world. Ma’s Alibaba is exhibit A with its two e-commerce divisions, TMall and Taobao, which we would recognize as Amazon and E-bay respectively. It’s a game-changer having these two under one roof. Having negotiated in setting up e-commerce consumer healthcare brand flagship stores (and not just TMall), I am struck by the interplay of pricing information between the two platforms. Taobao can and does feature branded product, bought on deal in the United States by aggressive small operators. The structured TMall trade promotion “requirements” coupled with the holiday price discounts is complicated. November 11, known as Double 11, is huge. The United States has nothing that matches the discounting depth. We could learn from this.

China’s Google is Baidu. (Or is it the United States' Baidu is Google?) Given restrictions placed on the Internet, Chinese consumer healthcare e-commerce content is critical as a trusted source of product information. TMall, JD, Koala and many other e-commerce platforms have developed excellent product content out of necessity; we can learn from that.

The frantic pace of parallel growth of traditional and e-commerce consumer health care has also spawned some fascinating hybrids and governmental creativity. Known by several names, cross-border trade has fostered industry/tax authority cooperation. Think of it as a special tax zone; instead of smuggling to avoid a standard 17% import duty a compromise of an 11.9% tax rate has aligned all parties. The government heavily punishes any smugglers attempting complete tax avoidance and the companies have a more even playing field while paying a lower tax rate. It also ensures that knockoffs don’t make it as all companies value consumer trust.

Perhaps more unique are the so-called Demonstration Stores found in the Cross-Border areas. Consumers can sample products and then immediately go to a computer and order online for home delivery. Traditional Retail meets E-commerce and both win. How would a market research firm classify that revenue?

What can US companies learn from China’s consumer healthcare trade structure? Here’s a partial list:

  1. Content delivery. China’s e-commerce platforms are quite good given their realities.
  2. Logistics of HUGE temporary price discounts. Understand Double 11.
  3. Hybrid structures where e-commerce and traditional blur.

Long before Jack Ma, the famous Chinese military philosopher Sun Tzu wrote, “Know the enemy and know yourself; in a hundred battles you will never be in peril.” The Chinese Trade isn’t an enemy, but we can learn from them. 


Ed Rowland is a Drug Store News contributing editor covering global issues. As the principal of Rowland Global, he believes in the promise of global business and supports companies in their strategy, tactics and execution of international growth initiatives

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