HEALTH

Survey uncovers food economizing among Type 2 diabetes population

BY Drug Store News Team

LONDON Results of a Pan-European survey announced Tuesday have revealed alarming new information regarding the eating habits of people with Type 2 diabetes. The survey indicated that the economic crisis is affecting the ability of people with Type 2 diabetes to manage their disease.

According to the American Medical Association Guide to Living with Diabetes, effective diabetes management includes choosing a series of small but frequent well-balanced meals spread across the day, to ensure that blood glucose is kept at optimum levels.

Twenty-six percent of respondents stated they have only one main meal a day and fewer than half (43%) were eating three or more meals a day. More than a third (37%) of respondents further stated that rising food prices and the “credit crunch” had affected their ability to balance their diet and had caused them to eat less.

The survey was undertaken to mark the introduction of the new LifeScan OneTouch VITA blood glucose meter with MealMemory technology, which allows people with diabetes to see the impact food has on their blood glucose levels. The survey had a sample of 1,410 respondents, and targeted people aged 60 and over with Type 2 diabetes across seven countries.

In response to these findings, LifeScan has launched an interactive Web site (http://www.lifescan.eu), which provides resources to help people with Type 2 diabetes understand and manage their disease more effectively

KelloggsDRSNhttp://www.centerstoregrowth.com

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Research shows condroitin sulfate can prevent joint structure degradation

BY Michael Johnsen

ATLANTA A new study published in the February edition of the American College of Rheumatology’s journal Arthritis & Rheumatism examined the effect of chondroitins 4 and 6 sulfate on osteoarthritis progression and symptoms. These chondroitins, unlike other chondroitin sulfate products sold as dietary supplements in the United States, has been approved as a prescription symptomatic slow acting drug for OA in many European countries.

Led by Andre Kahan of the University of Paris Descartes in Paris, the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study involved 622 patients with OA from France, Belgium, Switzerland, Austria and the United States. Patients had knee X-rays at the time of enrollment and at 12, 18 and 24 months. The X-rays were evaluated for joint space loss and patients were also assessed for OA symptoms and pain.

The results showed that “long-term administration of CS over two years can prevent joint structure degradation in patients with knee OA,” the authors stated. Joint space loss was significantly reduced in the CS group, fewer patients had progression of joint space width, and CS reduced pain in those taking it compared to the placebo group. CS was well-tolerated and there were no significant differences in the frequency of adverse events between the two groups.

The study showed that there was faster improvement regarding pain during the first year in the CS group compared to the placebo group. This may be due to the fact that all of the patients had pain symptoms, so the effect of CS was more noticeable early on. Since those who took a placebo also had decreased pain in the first year, it may also be due to the natural course of the disease. The authors note that the study involved CS, which is used as a prescription drug and that the results cannot be generalized to other chondroitin sulfate products or compounds, such as those available in the form of dietary supplements.

The decrease in joint space loss shown in this and another recent study involving 300 patients, suggests better outcomes for OA patients, according to the authors. They conclude: “Further studies with longer followup and different outcome criteria are warranted to assess whether the beneficial structural changes associated with CS demonstrated in our study are predictive of improvement in the long-term clinical progression of OA.”

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Study: Personal Care marketers should watch their spending

BY Drug Store News Team

LITTLE FALLS, N.J. Personal care marketers will be affected by the ability to increase retail prices, unless unique product benefits are highlighted, according to research firm Kline & Company.

The research firm, which released a study entitled “Personal Care: U.S. Competitor Cost Structures 2008”, points out that most companies have only an 11 percent operating margin, since personal care marketers spend over half of their budget on marketing. This, combined with the perpetual need to spend significantly on advertising and promotions in order to drive consumer awareness and demand in highly competitive categories, will continue to lead to margin pressures for personal care marketers.

Additionally, companies whose product lines are heavily focused on luxury products, such as Estee Lauder, will feel the sting of the recession more than those whose products tend to be priced lower, such as Avon, Johnson & Johnson, and Procter & Gamble.

The study also concludes that high oil prices over the past two years drove production and distribution costs for personal care marketers up significantly.

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