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Survey: Shoppers feel supermarkets are helpful in making healthful choices

BY Michael Johnsen

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. As many as 50% of shoppers felt that their supermarket helped them make healthful choices, according a recent Catalina Marketing survey (supported by the Food Marketing Institute) released Monday.

In addition, 36% of shoppers believed their supermarket helped them manage or reduce their risk of specific health concerns. And more than 40% of shoppers were interested in supermarkets providing recipes and information for specific health concerns, health screening services, nutritional counseling and personalized wellness plans.

“We will use this study to make it easier for both manufacturers and retailers to help shoppers make healthy, nutritious choices in every aisle of the store,” stated Sharon Glass, Catalina Marketing’s group VP health, wellness and beauty. “It uncovers what shoppers really want and how to design programs or services that best align with their needs. Making smart nutritional choices can notably improve overall health and how we feel each day.”

According to the findings, shoppers want a combination of convenience, cost, taste and messaging that will motivate them to replace fast-food meals with healthier options. “Our members want an integrated approach to creating comprehensive health-and-wellness programs,” stated Cathy Polley, VP health and wellness and executive director of the FMI Foundation at the Food Marketing Institute. “Catalina Marketing’s blueprint can help them make health and wellness a reality in their supermarket.”

Other findings include:

  • 38% of shoppers reported that their grocery store provides information on foods and beverages that can help manage their personal health concerns;
  • 25% believed that store employees are knowledgeable about nutrition. But less than one-third of respondents felt that supermarket employees were knowledgeable enough to provide assistance about nutrition, vitamins, nutritional supplements and over-the-counter health remedies;
  • 77% believed healthy food is expensive, and more than 80% said coupons for healthy products encourage healthy shopping;
  • 59% felt that healthy foods and beverages generally taste good. Fast-food fans are the least likely to agree that healthy options generally taste good;
  • 69% of shoppers were interested in having their store stock freshly prepared, healthy meals, and 64% were interested in programs that recommend healthier options for the products they generally buy through messages printed at the checkout or website tools; and
  • 51% of respondents with children find it hard to plan healthy meals. 

The online study surveyed more than 2,500 male and female adults across the United States older than 21 years of age with primary responsibility for the grocery-shopping in their homes. The study provided guidance on how the industry can best help shoppers make positive choices in nutrition and lifestyle management.

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Target launches anti-smoking campaign with American Cancer Society

BY DSN STAFF

MINNEAPOLIS — Target announced that it is launching a month-long anti-smoking campaign in connection with the American Cancer Society’s 2010 Great American Smokeout to support guests and team members in their efforts to quit smoking.

"Target is committed to helping our guests and team members reach their well-being goals, which may include quitting smoking, and we’re proud to work with the American Cancer Society for this year’s Great American Smokeout," said Dr. Joshua Riff, Target’s medical director. "As part of our focus on prevention, Target offers a variety of tools, tips and products for those who want to stop smoking and stay smoke-free. This campaign advances our prevention efforts and will ultimately lead to healthier communities."

The campaign will begin on Nov. 1 and will highlight Target’s assortment of stop-smoking aids and give greater visibility to Target Pharmacy and Target Clinic healthcare professionals, who can offer support, smoking-cessation materials and advice, the company reported. The campaign is anchored by in-store signing and informational brochures in all Target stores, as well as features in the weekly ad and at Target.com.

The American Cancer Society’s 35th annual Great American Smokeout takes place Nov. 18, and is designed to motivate and empower smokers with personalized tools, tips and support to help them quit for good.

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GSK, Amicus to develop, commercialize Amigal

BY Alaric DeArment

CRANBURY, N.J. British drug maker GlaxoSmithKline will work with U.S.-based Amicus Therapeutics to develop a drug for a rare genetic disease.

 

The two companies announced a deal to develop and commercialize Amigal (migalastat hydrochloride), a treatment for Fabry disease. Under the deal, GSK will pay Amicus $30 million upfront, as well as milestone payments of up to $170 million and royalties on future sales.

 

 

Fabry disease is a lysosomal storage disorder resulting from deficiencies of the enzyme alpha-galactosidase A. Lack of the enzyme results in buildup of a lipid called globotriaosylceramide, or GL-3, which is believed to cause the disease’s symptoms, such as pain, kidney failure and increased risk of heart attack and stroke. The disease affects 5,000 to 10,000 people worldwide.

 

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