HEALTH

Survey participants have gut health misconceptions

BY Michael Johnsen

CINCINNATI A recent GfK Roper "Gut Check" survey, sponsored by the Align brand, revealed that approximately 1-in-4 survey participants experience occasional digestive upsets, and of those, 1-in-5 have been told that these disruptive upsets are caused by their attitude or emotions, Procter & Gamble announced Wednesday.

"I see the frustration occasional digestive upsets cause my patients," stated Roshini Rajapaksa, a gastroenterologist at NYU Langone Medical Center. "The first step to building a stronger inside is to better understand how your digestive system works and what you can do to keep it healthy,” she said. "To help improve both their health and lifestyle, I teach my patients that it comes down to simple science — it is important to have the right balance of good and bad bacteria in the gut. When we replenish the good bacteria with probiotics it helps maintain a healthy digestive system."

 

Although probiotics, or good bacteria that provide a health benefit, have been in use for more than 100 years, the survey also found that people still have misconceptions about their gut health:

  • 43% of those surveyed believed that most types of bacteria are not helpful for the GI tract;
  • More than 40% believed that all probiotics essentially have the same benefits and are not strain specific; and
  • A large majority (77%) thought that probiotics found in supplements are not as natural as those found in foods.

 

 

The "Gut Check" survey findings also showed that digestive upsets can interrupt daily life. Of those who experienced occasional digestive upsets, more than half felt their upsets impacted their self confidence. Eight-in-10 tried to go about their day normally, but most still made adjustments to their activities. Nearly half missed an event or trip or avoided a social situation because of an occasional digestive upset, and more than one-third of survey respondents changed their diet to deal with their digestive upsets.

 

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Alcon IDC opposes Novartis merger

BY Michael Johnsen

HUNENBERG, Switzerland Novartis may need to reconsider its offer to acquire Alcon, according to a press release issued Monday.

Hans Caspar von der Crone, a Swiss legal and corporate governance expert, has concluded that a recommendation by the Alcon independent director committee is an indispensable first step before the board of Alcon can decide on the merger proposal.

The conclusion runs contrary to Novartis’ public implications that it would be able to unilaterally impose the merger irrespective of the IDC’s position once Novartis becomes Alcon’s majority shareholder.

Afull copy of the legal opinion is available on the IDC’s website, Transactioninfo.com/alcon.

The IDC had commissioned von der Crone, as an independent third party and expert in Swiss corporate law and corporate governance best practices, to review all relevant corporate documents and issue a legal opinion.

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Rainbow Light keeps minds at ease with new supplement

BY Michael Johnsen

SANTA CRUZ, Calif. Rainbow Light Nutritional Systems on Tuesday announced its introduction of Busy Brain Release, a supplement that delivers GABA and L-theanine, both of which blunt cortisol, a hormone released in response to stress, the company stated.

Studies suggested these ingredients support relaxed calm, better sleep, mental clarity and focus, and help the body adapt to stress, Rainbow Light added.

“When the mind is racing and stressed out, it can be difficult to focus and think clearly during the day, or sleep well at night,” explained Michele McRae, Rainbow Light’s director of formulation and quality. “Multitasking women trying to balance careers, families and social activities often experience chronic stress.”

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