HEALTH

Survey: Consumer utilization of fitness technology on the rise

BY Michael Johnsen

ARLINGTON, Va. — More than half (55%) of U.S. online consumers used a fitness technology in the past year, and more than one-third (37%) anticipate purchasing fitness technology in the next 12 months, according to new research by the Consumer Electronics Association. "Getting Connected with Emerging Fitness Technologies" shows the number of consumers who used a fitness technology in the past year increased 8% from 2010. Results from the study were released Wednesday at the mHealth Summit.

According to the study, 46% of consumers who do not exercise cite lack of motivation as the main reason for not exercising. For those who do exercise, the top reasons are to improve overall health (76%) and to lose weight (58%). The study found the primary benefits owners attribute to using fitness technologies are to stay motivated, monitor physical activity and make exercise more enjoyable.

“We continue to see technology play an increasingly important role in health and fitness,” stated Kevin Tillmann, senior research analyst, CEA. “Fitness technology is empowering consumers to assess their fitness levels, set achievable goals, track progress and make exercise more rewarding.”

Pedometers remain the most popular health and fitness device, but fitness video games saw the most dramatic increase in usage, almost doubling from 9% in 2010, to 16% in 2012. However, heart rate monitors and body mass index scales both saw a 6% decrease in usage from 2010.

“Wirelessly-connected devices have allowed for major strides within digital health and fitness,” Tillmann said. “Consumers already own devices, such as smartphones, that are capable of being used for exercise and fitness. This year we saw considerable growth in fitness apps. This enables the devices we already own to turn into pedometers, accelerometers and distance trackers.”

 

 

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Study: Patients once considered ‘aspirin resistant’ may only need to switch to an uncoated aspirin

BY Michael Johnsen

PHILADELPHIA — Patients once considered "aspirin resistant" may not be resistant to aspirin after all, according to a study published online by Circulation, the journal of the American Heart Association. Rather, the protective coating around the aspirin to prevent stomach issues may be delaying the absorption of aspirin, leading clinicians to believe that patients are aspirin resistant. 

Roughly one-fifth of Americans take low-dose aspirin every day for heart-healthy benefits. But based on either urine or blood tests of how aspirin blocks the stickiness of platelets — blood cells that clump together in the first stages of forming harmful clots — up to one-third of patients are deemed unlikely to benefit from daily use, or aspirin resistant.

In people who have suffered a heart attack, low-dose aspirin reduces the chances of a second event by about one-fifth, making it perhaps one of the most cost-effective drugs currently prescribed, noted study author Tilo Grosser, director of the Institute for Translational Medicine and Therapeutics. Although consumed widely by the worried well, the relative usefulness of low-dose aspirin in patients who have never had a heart attack is more controversial. According to previous primary prevention studies, low-dose aspirin reduces this group’s very low risk of a first attack by about the same number of serious stomach bleeds it causes.

In the study of 400 healthy volunteers scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, went looking for people who are truly resistant to the benefits of aspirin, such as might result from a particular genetic makeup. They failed to find one case of aspirin resistance; rather, they found “pseudoresistance,” due to the coating found on most brands of aspirin, often preferred by patients for the protection it is claimed to provide the stomach. What’s more, a urine biomarker of platelet stickiness was not able to find which volunteers were even pseudoresistant.

“When we looked for aspirin resistance using the platelet test, it detected it in about one-third of our volunteers,” Grosser said. “But, when we looked a second time at the incidence of aspirin resistance in the volunteers, the one-third that we measured who was now resistant was mostly different people. Nobody had a stable pattern of resistance that was specific to coated aspirin.”

To address the reason for this pseudoresistance, the researchers compared test results of coated aspirin with the same dose of regular uncoated aspirin in volunteer subgroups for coated versus immediate-release, uncoated aspirin. Resistance was absent in the group that took the uncoated aspirin.

The coating delayed absorption compared to immediate-release, uncoated aspirin. This led to a false impression of aspirin resistance in people taking coated aspirin. Platelets of such patients remained sensitive to aspirin when examined in a test tube, so they were not truly resistant to the action of aspirin.

Although supposedly easier on the stomach, coating of aspirin has never been shown to reduce the likelihood of serious stomach bleeds compared to the same dose of uncoated aspirin, Grosser noted. “These studies question the value of coated, low-dose aspirin,” commented Garret FitzGerald, director of the Institute for Translational Medicine and Therapeutics. “This product adds cost to treatment, without any clear benefit. Indeed, it may lead to the false diagnosis of aspirin resistance and the failure to provide patients with an effective therapy. Our results also call into question the value of using office tests to look for such resistance.”

 

 

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J.CABIGON says:
Mar-28-2013 04:05 am

Yah! exactly your right about that but all things in this world have it's own advantages and disadvantages. I totally appreciate your comment. online marketing company

T.Greeves says:
Dec-13-2012 06:08 am

I think that specially seniors should be more aware of these, aspirin is just become friend of this generation... rencontres senior

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Misfit Wearables launches next-generation Shine activity tracker

BY Michael Johnsen

REDWOOD CITY, Calif. — Misfit Wearables is teeing up a revolutionary activity tracking device — the Misfit Shine — that’s constructed from aircraft-grade aluminum, is waterproof and is able to wirelessly sync activity data to a smartphone without the need for a Bluetooth connection. 

"The Shine is an activity tracker that’s smart, elegant and really strong," noted Misfit Wearables CEO Sonny Vu. "Because it’s made of solid metal, transmitting wirelessly is almost impossible. But to keep things simple, we developed a new type of wireless sync technology — all you have to do is place the Shine on your smartphone."

Retailing for a suggested $99, the new product launch has already caught the attention of gizmo wonks like Peter Ha at Gizmodo, who profiled the quarter-sized product in a Nov. 14 writeup. "You might not have ever heard of Misfit Wearables but you’ll want to pay attention starting now that its first gadget has made its debut," Ha wrote. 

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