BEAUTY CARE

Suppliers target growing adult acne segment

BY Antoinette Alexander


With more than half of women in the United States between the ages of 25 and 58 years battling some form of acne and the average age for acne patients on the rise, according to the American Academy of Dermatology, it is no surprise that sales of acne treatments have experienced an uptick at food, drug and mass. The sales trend is likely to continue as manufacturers continue to develop formulas to battle adult acne.


According to SymphonyIRI Group, sales of acne treatments for the 52 weeks ended June 12 at food, drug and mass (excluding Walmart) have increased 2.7% to more than $388 million. Among the top 10 brands, Neutrogena’s new Rapid Clear experienced the greatest growth, rising nearly 47%.


Given that many acne treatments on the market target teens, manufacturers increasingly are taking into account the special needs of adult skin. One such example is Procter & Gamble’s Olay brand, which introduced in July its new Olay Professional Pro-X Clear for adult acne.


This three-step daily skin care regimen is designed to treat adult acne and minimize the appearance of pores and refine texture. The system ($42) is comprised of a pore clarifying cleanser, skin clearing treatment and complexion renewing lotion. Additional products in the line include an SPF15 moisturizer and intensive refining sulfur mask, priced at $29.99 each.


Also launching in July is La Roche-Posay’s Effaclar Serum pore-refining/anti-wrinkle serum. Women often have to make a choice between treating acne blemishes with a product that has no anti-aging benefits or treating the signs of aging with a product that may clog pores. Effaclar Serum pore-refining/anti-wrinkle serum offers a solution to treat both these concerns. It has a suggested retail price of $39.95.

 

 The article above is part of the DSN Category Review Series. For the complete Skin Care Buy-In Report, including extensive charts, data and more analysis, click here.

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BEAUTY CARE

Many higher-income shoppers opt to buy private-label cosmetics, Mintel finds

BY Antoinette Alexander

CHICAGO — Women in the higher-income bracket won’t object to buying private-label cosmetics if they think that their quality and performance are on par with national brands, according to recent Mintel research.

Mintel research found that 64% of women in the $100,000 to $149,000 income bracket planned to continue buying some store-brand/private-label color cosmetics and some brand-name color cosmetics; meanwhile, only 50% of those in the $50,000 to $74,000, and 48% in the $75,000 to $99,000, bracket said the same thing.

"This does not mean higher-income women do not purchase higher-end, national brands," Mintel senior beauty analyst Kat Fay said. "But they can be selective, often spending more on one category or occasion than another."

One-third of Mintel respondents (33%) said they are buying store-brand/private-label cosmetics more now than they did this time last year. More than half (51%) indicated that they purchased private label because it offered the best value for the money. Depending on the product, some private-label cosmetics can be as much as 30% to 40% cheaper than brand-name cosmetics. Meanwhile, 33% of respondents said they were motivated to try a private-label cosmetic because of a coupon or special offer, and 26% of shoppers went on a recommendation from a friend or family member.

"In addition to recommendations and advertising, shoppers are influenced by in-store cosmetic demos," Fay added. "Demos show a product in action, teach shoppers how to properly use an item and allow them to ask pertinent questions. Retailers say demos always spur sales."

For those who don’t purchase private-label color cosmetics, nearly half (49%) said they are happy with their brand-name product and have no desire to try anything new, 32% said they never thought to try something else and 18% feared that store brands use cheap or inferior ingredients. This offers an opportunity for marketers to educate consumers on the quality of their products and ingredients.

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Mustela introduces Stelatria Purifying Recovery Cream

BY Antoinette Alexander

NEW YORK — Mustela, a skin care brand from Expanscience Labs that is designed for babies and mothers-to-be, has developed its new Mustela Stelatria Purifying Recovery Cream, which will be available in September.

According to the company, new research from Expanscience Labs shows that the emollient complex of copper, zinc and manganese found in Stelatria Purifying Recovery Cream — the newest addition to Mustela’s Dermo-Pediatrics line — stimulates epidermal regeneration and restores barrier function in skin that has been compromised by irritation, allergies or minor cuts and scrapes. Consequently, the appearance of scars is reduced.

Made for newborns, infants, toddlers and adults alike, Stelatria Purifying Recovery Cream also contains the patented natural active ingredient BioEcolia, which promises to bolster skin’s own protective flora to further support recovery.

Stelatria Purifying Recovery Cream will be available in September and will have a suggested retail price of $18.50.

Mustela is a leading cosmetic brand in the European pharmaceutical market for baby products. In France, Mustela products are present in 90% of all pharmacies and used in more than 50% of maternity units for the care of newborn, the company stated.

Today, Mustela is sold in about 40 countries, through its own subsidiaries or distributor companies. Group subsidiaries have been set up in Spain, Portugal, Italy, Belgium, Switzerland, Poland, Mexico and the United States.

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