HEALTH

Supplements target new millennial moms

BY Michael Johnsen

There is perhaps a latent opportunity for retailers to create a new destination center out of three existing categories that would appeal to a new millennial mom — products boosting preconception health; products supporting a pregnant woman’s health; and products supporting lactation and breast feeding following her pregnancy.

(Click here to view the full VMS Report.)

“We see an opportunity to extend [the category],” Jamie Schapiro, CMO of Premama, told Drug Store News. “The maternity wellness market [not just supplements] is a $2.5 billion opportunity.”

According to Premama, the prenatal support vitamins and supplements space is growing year over year by 13.8%. And lactation supplements, specifically, are growing at a rate of 41.5% year over year.

There are some 4.5 million pregnancies each year, though the actual number of women who get pregnant each year approaches 6.1 million.

But that’s not for lack of trying. About 6% of married women 15 years to 44 years old are unable to get pregnant after one year of unprotected sex (infertility). And about 12% of women 15 years to 44 years old in the United States have difficulty getting pregnant (impaired fecundity).

On average, women between the ages of 15 years and 44 years old expect to have between two and three children — two of every five women expect to have at least two children — according to the National Survey of Family Growth.

And as many as 72.6% newborns are breast fed for at least three months.

Premama isn’t the only specialty supplement company targeting the maternity health space. Wellnext recently added 35+ Mom & Baby, a prenatal multivitamin for expectant mothers over 35 years old, and Prenatal & Postnatal Protein, a supplement designed to provide sustained energy from conception through nursing.

Earlier this year, Healthy mama introduced Nip the Nausea! Morning Sickness Capsules — the first OB/GYN-formulated and American Pregnancy Association-endorsed supplements to help reduce morning sickness and nausea, according to the company. The supplement contains ginger, which has the ability to neutralize stomach acids and therefore reduce morning sickness, gas and bloating, as well as aid in digestion. The supplement also contains low levels of B6. B6 deficiencies are known to increase the occurrence of headaches and nausea.

And last year Church & Dwight leveraged its First Response brand into the dietary supplement set. First Response multivitamin gummies were developed to provide women with the recommended amount of folic acid in a gummy form.

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HEALTH

A major shift from heavy buying to light buying

BY Michael Johnsen

A key trend captured by the 2016 TABS Analytics Vitamin and Minerals Supplements study is the continued decline in the number of heavy buyers (those who purchased more than three types of vitamins in a year). Heavy-buyer penetration peaked at 40% in 2012, but in 2016, heavy-buyer penetration dropped to 30%.

(Click here to view the full VMS Report.)

“We see a meaningful shift away from heavy buying and toward light buying,” noted Kurt Jetta, president of TABS Analytics. They represent only 7% of the buyers, down from 10% of buyers two years ago, but account for 30% of sales.

The decline in heavy buyers is particularly noticeable among women, which has gone from 45% in 2012 to just 32% in 2016. Despite this drop in heavy buyers, overall purchase incidence among female buyers has increased to an all-time high of 82%, driven by more light buyers.

The 2016 VMS study also found that heavy buying among younger consumers (ages 18 years to 54 years old) has dropped from 25% in 2015 to 21% in 2016. However, consumers 55 years old and older are twice as likely to be heavy buyers (43%).

This large drop in heavy buyers occurred primarily in the mass market channels, which has caused mass market penetration to decline for the past two years, TABS noted. Specialty stores and online stores have held onto their heavy buyer base and also gained light buyers.

This is the first time since 2010 that TABS has tracked a shift in the vitamin market away from mass market and towards specialty brick and mortar. However, mass market is still the most-shopped channel with 65% of buyers shopping in it exclusively, while only 14% of all buyers shop exclusively at non-mass channels (online or in specialty stores).

The study found that 55% of all shopping visits are to Walmart, CVS, Walgreens, online retailers and food stores.

The online retail channel is the top outlet for sales of vitamin, mineral and supplements, hitting $2 billion and surpassing Walmart’s vitamin sales of $1.7 billion in 2016, according to the study.

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HEALTH

Millennials making big impact on dietary supplement category sales

BY Michael Johnsen

Perhaps because of their parents and grandparents, millennials are taking a shine to the use of dietary supplements as a strategy toward being healthier, according to the 2016 Consumer Survey on Dietary Supplements conducted by Ipsos Public Affairs on behalf of the Council for Responsible Nutrition. Overall, as many as 170 million U.S. adults, or 71% of the population, take dietary supplements. Different from previous years, the 2016 survey points to similar supplement-consumption patterns among younger and middle-aged adult populations, with 70% of adults ages 18 years to 34 years old and of those aged 35 years to 54 years old reporting dietary supplement use.

(Click here to view the full VMS Report.)

In comparison, only 65% of adults aged 18 to 34 years old reported taking dietary supplements in 2015, while 68% of adults ages 35 years to 54 years olds said the same. “It is exciting to see the growth in supplement usage among younger adults, especially after our 2015 survey indicated that increased usage should be anticipated among those ages 18 to 34 over the next five years,” stated Judy Blatman, SVP communications at CRN. “Every industry is talking about the millennials and the impact this generation will have. Our data shows the impact is already being made on the dietary supplement industry as young adults are increasingly incorporating dietary supplements into their health regimens.”

The increase in supplement usage among younger adults also can potentially be correlated with the shift seen in the most common reasons users take dietary supplements. Historically, the top-two reasons for taking supplements among supplement users were for “overall health-and-wellness benefits” and “to fill nutrient gaps in my diet.” This year, however, energy (30%) has risen to become the No. 2 reason for taking supplements among supplement users, behind only “for overall health-and-wellness benefits” (42%), which remains top of mind. “To fill nutrient gaps in my diet” now ranks third when it comes to reasons why supplement users take supplements, at 28%.

Of course, increased interest in millennials isn’t the only demographic trend contributing to increased supplement interest — baby boomers are still influencing a groundswell in usage, as well. This year’s results indicate that, as in years past, the oldest population surveyed (adults aged 55-plus years old) maintains the highest percentage of supplement use at 74%. The 2016 CRN Consumer Survey on Dietary Supplements found that the five most popular supplements are the multivitamin, vitamin D, vitamin C, calcium and vitamin B. According to IRI, sales of multivitamins reached $1.5 billion on 0.3% year-over-year growth for the 52 weeks ended Oct. 23 across total U.S. multi-outlet channels. Vitamin D generated $394.6 million, up 9.1%; vitamin C generated $324.2 million, down 4.3%; sales of calcium were down 9.6% to $233.8 million; and sales of vitamin B were up 1.3% to $455.5 million. Another finding, which is consistent with the findings from CRN’s previous surveys, is the high level of confidence Americans have in supplements. According to the 2016 survey, 85% of U.S. adults have overall confidence in the safety, quality and effectiveness of dietary supplements. Among supplement users it’s even higher, with 96% indicating confidence.

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