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Supervalu throws in $1 million in support of youth sports

BY Michael Johnsen

EDEN PRAIRIE, Minn. — Supervalu on Tuesday announced its commitment of $1 million to sponsor 1,542 youth sports teams in markets where its banners operate.

“Because diet and exercise are important to well-being, we saw this sponsorship as a complement to our focus on helping our shoppers eat well and a nice way to support stronger — and healthier — neighborhoods," stated Shelly Nelson, Supervalu corporate director of strategic media services.

The sponsorships, which began last spring, have helped to offset the cost of local youth baseball and soccer programs for kids between the ages of 4 years and 10 years. All told, the sponsorships have supported 1,542 teams — 761 baseball teams and 781 soccer teams — enabling more than 20,000 kids with the opportunity to participate in sports.

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New research sheds light on link between makeup, perception of attractiveness

BY Allison Cerra

CINCINNATI — Color cosmetics use can impact judgments of attractiveness and character, according to new research.

The two studies — which were conducted by Procter & Gamble’s Beauty and Grooming division and lead investigator Nancy Etcoff, assistant clinical professor at Harvard and associate researcher at Massachusetts General Hospital department of psychiatry — included 100 photos of 25 women’s faces (ages 20 to 50 years, who self-identified as Hispanic, Caucasian or African-American), which were judged without makeup and with three different applied makeup looks that included varying levels of light to dark makeup shades (referred to as "luminous contrast"), which informally were classified as "natural," "professional" and "glamorous," respectively.

In the first study, 149 adults (61 men and 88 women) of different ages and ethnicities, were shown all three makeup looks for 250 milliseconds.  The three makeup looks realized increased ratings of attractiveness, competence, likability and trust, compared with the ratings of the same faces without makeup. Additionally, in the second study, which included 119 adults (30 males and 89 females) of different ages and ethnicities, who had unlimited time to inspect the faces, gave both the natural and professional makeup looks increased ratings of attractiveness, competence, likability and trust, whereas the glamorous look, which had the highest luminous contrast, was judged to be equally likable, significantly more attractive and competent, but less trustworthy, compared with women without makeup.

All participants saw the faces in a randomized sequence, the researchers noted.

"Researchers have studied first impressions of innate facial characteristics, such as facial symmetry, but until now, no research has rigorously examined the role that applied beauty or features of the extended human phenotype, such as makeup and hair color, play in perception of beauty, personality and character at first glance and longer inspection," Etcoff said. "For the first time, we have found that applying makeup has an effect beyond increasing attractiveness — it impacts first impressions and overall judgments of perceived likeability, trustworthiness, and competence. In today’s world of self-portraits appearing on networking and dating websites, ballots, resumes and applications, the results of the study have broad implications."

 

"Collaborating with global academic and industry experts has allowed P&G Beauty & Grooming scientists to transform cutting-edge color science into solutions for skin, cosmetic and hair color products," said Shekhar Mitra, SVP research and development at P&G Global Beauty and Grooming. "This fundamental research helps us better understand the motivations and desired beauty outcomes of our consumers and how to translate that knowledge into innovations that have a proven impact on perception."

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Study: 3-in-4 cancer patients are vitamin D deficient

BY Michael Johnsen

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. — More than three-quarters of cancer patients have insufficient levels of vitamin D, and the lowest levels are associated with more advanced cancer, according to a study presented Oct. 2 at the 53rd Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology.



“Until recently, studies have not investigated whether vitamin D has an impact on the prognosis or course of cancer. Researchers are just starting to examine how vitamin D may impact specific features of cancer, such as the stage or extent of tumor spread, prognosis, recurrence or relapse of disease, and even subtypes of cancer,” stated Thomas Churilla, lead author of the study and a medical student at the Commonwealth Medical College, Scranton, Pa.

The study involved 160 patients with a median age of 64 years split evenly between men and women. The five most common primary diagnoses were breast, prostate, lung, thyroid and colorectal cancer. A total of 77% of patients had vitamin D concentrations either deficient (less than 20 ng/mL) or suboptimal (20-30 ng/mL). The median serum vitamin D level was 23.5 ng/mL. Regardless of the age or sex of the patient, levels of vitamin D were below the median predicted for advanced stage disease in the patient group.

Patients who were found to be vitamin D deficient were administered replacement therapy, increasing serum D levels by an average of 14.9 ng/mL. Investigators will be analyzing if vitamin D supplementation had an impact on aspects of treatment or survival in the long-term.


“The benefits of vitamin D outside of improving bone health are controversial, yet there are various levels of evidence to support that vitamin D has a role in either the prevention or the prediction of outcome of cancer,” Churilla said. “Further study is needed to continue to understand the relationship between vitamin D and cancer.”


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