HEALTH

Study: Weight gain among lower protein formula-fed infants is similar to breast-fed ones

BY Michael Johnsen

MADISON, N.J. Newly published findings indicated that infants fed a lower-protein infant formula developed by Pfizer Nutrition gained weight at a similar rate to those who were breast-fed, according to a study published online Wednesday in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

 

"This study showed that when we fed infants with a formula that contained specially adjusted levels of protein that more closely matched those found in breast milk, these babies grew at a rate similar to breast-fed babies," stated study author Rosario Capeding. "As we learn more about the importance of nutrition during early childhood, we recognize there is a critical need to ensure nutrients are received in the most appropriate proportions to support appropriate growth and development."

 

 

Added Patricia DeRusso, chief medical officer and VP Pfizer Nutrition: "At Pfizer Nutrition, we are committed to developing infant formulas that help formula-fed babies to achieve growth and health outcomes similar to human milk-fed babies. This study further supports the improved nutrient composition in our newly reformulated Gold line of infant formula, which will allow us to continue to provide growing children with the right amount of the nutrients they need during their critical early years."

 

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Poll: Many Americans claim to be improving their diets

BY Allison Cerra

NEW YORK While many consumers claim to have adjusted their diets to include more healthy foods and beverages, new data suggested that there may be a disparity between what is considered "good" by consumers and by experts.

 

Anew poll by Harris Interactive, conducted between Sept. 14 and 20 among 2,620 adults, found that the majority of all adults claimed that they:

  • Frequently or somewhat often eat healthier at home compared with when dining out (79%);
  • Drink water as opposed to another type of beverage at meals (74%);
  • Choose healthy snacks (72%);
  • Eat a balanced diet (72%);
  • Read nutritional information on packaged food products before buying it (68%);
  • Attempt to eat smaller portions (64%); and
  • Exercise regularly (57%).

All of the responses were in line with what doctors and nutrition experts recommend for people to maintain a healthy weight.

 

Harris Interactive, however, noted that some of these results may reflect what consumers think they should be doing rather than what they actually are doing. For example, while there were some differences in their replies to this question among those who are and are not overweight or obese, the differences are not very large. Most of those who are obese or even morbidly obese claimed to be doing the same healthy things that those who are not overweight claimed they were doing.

 

Relatively few people are regularly (five or more times per week) eating a full breakfast (22%); a full or well-balanced lunch (21%); or a full or well-balanced dinner (37%). Overall, 32% of consumers surveyed felt they were heavier than they should be but also felt they generally were healthy and content. Among the 32%:

  • 10% were normal weight;
  • 41% were overweight;
  • 55% were obese; and
  • 30% were morbidly obese.

 

Responses to the poll were analyzed by Americans’ body mass index.

This Harris Poll was conducted online within the United States between Sept. 14 and 20, 2010, among 2,620 adults (aged 18 years and over). Figures for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, region and household income were weighted where necessary to bring them into line with their actual proportions in the population. Propensity score weighting also was used to adjust for respondents’ propensity to be online.

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CDC, Brickfish launch ‘The Flu Ends With U’

BY Michael Johnsen

SAN DIEGO The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have signed with Brickfish to launch a social awareness program around the importance of getting the flu vaccine for the 2010-2011 flu season, Brickfish announced Tuesday.

 

The program, “The Flu Ends With U,” asks consumers for their help in creating public service announcements to assist in getting the word out via online and social media.

 

 

“We were thrilled to partner with the CDC to help them harness the power of social media for the greater good and to drive awareness of the flu vaccine,” stated Nichole Goodyear, CEO of Brickfish. “By utilizing the Brickfish platform, the CDC will be able to track in real time the depth and breadth of the awareness they are spreading.”

 

 

The CDC’s “The Flu Ends With U” social awareness program ends Dec. 20. For complete details, visit Brickfish.com/Lifestyles/TheFluEndsWithU.

 

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