HEALTH

Study: Vitamin D deficiency linked to clogged arteries in people with diabetes

BY Michael Johnsen

ST. LOUIS — People with diabetes often develop clogged arteries that cause heart disease, and new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that low vitamin D levels are to blame. In a study published Nov. 9 in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, the researchers reported that blood vessels are less like to clog in people with diabetes who get adequate vitamin D. But in patients with insufficient vitamin D, immune cells bind to blood vessels near the heart, then trap cholesterol to block those blood vessels.

“About 26 million Americans now have Type 2 diabetes,” stated principal investigator Carlos Bernal-Mizrachi. “And as obesity rates rise, we expect even more people will develop diabetes. Those patients are more likely to experience heart problems due to an increase in vascular inflammation, so we have been investigating why this occurs.”

In earlier research, Bernal-Mizrachi, an assistant professor of medicine and of cell biology and physiology, and his colleagues found that vitamin D appears to play a key role in heart disease. This new study takes their work a step further, suggesting that when vitamin D levels are low, a particular class of white blood cell is more likely to adhere to cells in the walls of blood vessels. “We took everything into account,” said first author Amy Riek, instructor in medicine. “We looked at blood pressure, cholesterol, diabetes control, body weight and race. But only vitamin D levels correlated to whether these cells stuck to the blood vessel wall.” 

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a.arnold says:
Apr-09-2013 09:31 pm

Peoples negligence are the reason why we have a lot of illnesses or diseases that we are facing its because of our lifestyle, we dont eat vegetables and fruits, we only consume those can goods, restaurants, and other fast foods that can be easily buy, these are the reason why are life are also fast. helse

A.REESE says:
Jan-22-2013 03:44 am

Vitamin D deficiency when the level of vitamin D in your body is too low can cause your bones to become thin, brittle or misshapen. If you're concerned about buy music downloads whether you're getting enough vitamin D, talk to your doctor about your diet and whether a vitamin supplement might benefit you. buy sound cloud followers

[email protected] says:
Jan-10-2013 04:46 pm

Ross, Better late than never, right? Sorry to have missed your comment! In the original article, the authors defined vitamin D deficiency as less than 30 nanograms per milliliter of blood. According to the 2010 update by the Institutes of Medicine, the RDA for vitamin D for people under 70 is 600 international units. For people over 70 it's 800. Here are some resources for you: The original press release from which I sourced this story: https://news.wustl.edu/news/Pages/24586.aspx And a (free) book on the benefits of supplementing compiled by the Council for Responsible Nutrition: http://www.crnusa.org/benefits/

R.MURRAY says:
Nov-15-2012 09:34 am

Alrighty now, and the proper protocol would be...? What is the dosage?

J.LUCK says:
Nov-14-2012 07:04 pm

Being a health nut i take Bio-Curcumin from Life Extension and Liposomal Vitamin D from MaxHealthLabs.com ... These products are near pharmacutical grade and fit right into this good article.

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HEALTH

Study: Graphic, stop-smoking images more effective than cancer-warning text

BY Michael Johnsen

SAN DIEGO — Health warning labels on cigarette packages that use pictures to show the health consequences of smoking are effective in reaching adult smokers, according to the results of a new study published in the December issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine

Although previous studies have demonstrated that warning labels with pictorial imagery are more effective than warning labels featuring only text in increasing knowledge about smoking dangers and promoting the benefits of quitting, this new research shows which kind of pictures appears to work best among adult smokers in the U.S., including smokers from disadvantaged groups where smoking rates are highest.

"More than 40 countries have implemented pictorial health warning labels. The U.S. was scheduled for implementation in 2012, but tobacco industry litigation has delayed implementation by claiming that the pictorial warnings the FDA proposed violate the industry’s right to free speech," stated James Thrasher, lead investigator with the Department of Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior, Arnold School of Public Health at the University of South Carolina. "To inform future warning label policy development and implementation, more data are needed on U.S. consumer responses to various kinds of warning label content," he said. "The current study addresses this issue, while focusing on responses among smokers from low-income populations, where smoking remains prevalent because previous tobacco control interventions have been less successful in reaching this group than higher income populations."

With financial support from the South Carolina Clinical & Translational Research Institute residing at the Medical University of South Carolina CTSA, the National Institute of Drug Abuse and the U.S. National Cancer Institute, Thrasher and his research team conducted field experiments with nearly 1,000 adult smokers from July 2011 to January 2012. 

"The present study provided the first direct test of the hypothesis that pictorial health warning labels work better than text-only labels among people with low health literacy," Thrasher said. "Ratings of the personal relevance and effectiveness of pictorial labels compared to textual labels were no different for smokers in high- compared to low-health literacy groups. However, smokers with low-health literacy rated pictorial labels as more credible than text-only warnings, whereas no difference was found among smokers with high-health literacy."

The reaction to the specific type of imagery used in the pictorial warning labels also varied by study participants’ health literacy and race. Warning labels with abstract imagery produced the greatest differences between these two groups, although this type of warning label imagery produced the weakest responses overall. Across the board, participants rated the graphic warning labels as the most effective and most likely to influence them.

"These results suggest that the FDA should consider implementing warning labels with more graphic imagery in order to maximize the impact of warnings across different populations of adult smokers, including more disadvantaged smokers," Thrasher noted. 

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Reports: P&G, Teva partner on European OTC company called PGT Healthcare, gain EU approval

BY Michael Johnsen

CINCINNATI — Procter & Gamble and Teva Pharmaceutical on Monday gained European Union approval for a joint venture on the sale of nonprescription medicines to be called PGT Healthcare, according to published reports. 

According to the reports, the joint venture didn’t raise competition concerns. P&G will have a 51% stake in the venture. 

 

 

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