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Study: Risk of breast cancer more apparent among women with Type 2 diabetes

BY Allison Cerra

NEW YORK — A study conducted by the University of Alberta found that women with Type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of developing breast cancer.

The study, which was published in the Oct. 4 issue of Diabetes Care, examined 170,000 premenopausal (under the age of 55 years) and postmenopausal women (ages 55 years and older), half of which were diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. After following up with them four to five years later, 1.4% of all women were diagnosed with breast cancer; however, postmenopausal women diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes were more likely to develop breast cancer.

Commenting on the results, study author Jeffrey Johnson told Reuters Health that "the relationship that we see (between diabetes and cancer), we wondered if it was something about the fact that people with diabetes go to the doctor’s office more often. When a new diagnosis of diabetes is made, people undergo a lot of tests and general health exams."

"I think there are so many things going on in the relationship that this is maybe only one part of it. We’re really early on in understanding this relationship," he said.

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Research may provide insight to cause of birth defects among babies born to diabetic mothers

BY Allison Cerra

NEW YORK — A new study conducted by a team at the Joslin Diabetes Center suggested that a certain enzyme could cause birth defects among babies born to women with diabetes.

The enzyme, known as AMP kinase, could cause babies to be at an increased risk of developing neural tube effects (i.e., such conditions as spinal bifida) and certain heart defects, because it blocks the expression of a gene known as Pax3, which helps the neural tube form.

"The stimulation of a metabolism-sensing enzyme that can regulate specific genes explains how oxidative stress, which is generated throughout the embryo during maternal hyperglycemia, causes malformation of specific embryo structures," said Mary Loeken, who headed the study. "We now know that we must do whatever we can to prevent AMPK from being stimulated."

The results were published Monday in Diabetologia.


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CDC, Walgreens pharmacists on hand for Black Women’s Roundtable event

BY Michael Johnsen

RIVERDALE, Ga. — The Black Women’s Roundtable, part of the National Coalition on Black Civic Participation, will host an event this Saturday that will have representatives from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Walgreens pharmacists on hand to address health issues and administer free flu shots, the group announced Friday.

The event is the Black Women’s Roundtable Healthy Wealthy Wise National Empowerment Tour, which will feature a luncheon with actresses Vivica Fox and Demetria McKinney, Riverdale mayor Evelyn Wynn-Dixon and the first African-American female fire chief, East Point fire chief Rosemary Cloud.

The event is free and open to the public.
 

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