HEALTH

Study: Regular blood glucose monitoring increases medication adherence

BY Michael Johnsen

MILPITAS, Calif. — Blood glucose monitoring is associated with reduced A1C levels and greater adherence to medication in Type 2 diabetes patients who do not take insulin, according to a study published in the September issue of Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics.

The preliminary study findings were based on a retrospective analysis of health insurance data and was led by Lifescan’s Naunihal Virdi. The results are based on an analysis of 4.5 years of data gathered from 5,172 patients with Type 2 diabetes who were newly treated with noninsulin diabetes medication. Patients who tested their blood glucose showed a greater overall decrease in A1C than those not testing (-1.4 vs. -0.6 A1C percentage points respectively). Overall, higher blood glucose testing frequency was associated with greater decreases in A1C levels. Patients who tested at least once per day had the greatest reductions in A1C levels compared with patients who tested less frequently, or not at all.

This study also found that patients who tested their blood glucose were more likely to take their diabetes medication as prescribed than patients who didn’t test (49.9% vs. 38.2%, respectively). Again, testing frequency was a factor, with 64.1% of patients who tested at least once a day being adherent to their medications compared to less than 50% of those testing less frequently.

“Good glycemic control is key to reducing complications in patients with diabetes,” Virdi said. “For Type 2 patients who don’t take insulin, this study adds to the growing body of evidence that regular self-monitoring of blood sugar may contribute to improved diabetes control, as well as improved compliance in taking medications as prescribed.”

The study findings were based on a retrospective analysis of health insurance data and are considered by the authors as preliminary to other studies that may confirm these findings via a prospective clinical trial. To view the abstract of the study, click here

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HDMA Factbook: 2011 health product sales reach $294 billion

BY Michael Johnsen

ARLINGTON, Va. — Healthcare product sales through the nation’s primary healthcare distributors hit a record high of $294 billion in 2011, according to the 2012-2013 HDMA Factbook released Friday. Specifically, pharmaceutical products moved by distributors represent approximately 90% of sales in the United States.

“This year’s Factbook continues to provide valuable metrics on distributor efficiencies,” stated Karen Ribler, EVP and COO of the Center for Healthcare Supply Chain Research. “It shows that healthcare distributors continue to be an essential stakeholder in the supply chain as the pharmaceutical market evolves.”  

According to the Factbook, 2011 distributor sales, which increased by nearly 7% since 2010, outpaced the total growth of the pharmaceutical market during the same year. As IMS Health data indicated, pharmaceutical industry sales grew by 4% over 2010 to reach a total of $319.9 billion.

A major reason for this growth is due to the continued introduction of specialty/biotech products into the marketplace, HDMA concluded.

While the majority of traditional distributors’ net sales — 98% — continue to be earned by distributing pharmaceuticals, the ongoing “patent cliff” is still affecting the product mix within these sales figures. Generic pharmaceuticals in particular gained 32% over 2010 to represent 11% of total distributor sales, while branded pharmaceutical sales have decreased by nearly 2% to reach nearly 75% of sales. Sales of prescription specialty products through distributors also fell slightly by 1% to account for 12% of distributors’ sales. 

At the warehouse level, individual HDMA-member distribution centers processed an average of 27.2 million products in 2011. This represents more than 390,000 orders placed for healthcare products from an average of 1,100 manufacturers.

The Factbook noted that distributors’ profit margins grew slightly, with net profit after taxes to net sales increasing to 1.2% (from 1.1% in 2010).           

Published by the Center for Healthcare Supply Chain Research, the 84th edition of the HDMA Factbook is a comprehensive reference tool based on information gathered from the Healthcare Distribution Management Association’s members. It provides distribution industry performance measures in such areas as market characteristics, finance, operations, information systems and distributor demographics and is produced with support from Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals; RDC-Rochester Drug Cooperative; Teva Pharmaceuticals USA; EXP Pharmaceuticals Corp.; Ranbaxy Pharmaceuticals; and Smith Drug Company, Div. J M Smith Corporation.

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JAMA: Director of tobacco research suggests most benefits outweigh risks when considering cessation

BY Michael Johnsen

BOSTON — Smokers who have been unsuccessful to date in trying to kick the nicotine habit may be able to stop smoking by combining two smoking cessation approaches, according to a report published in the Oct. 17 issue of JAMA.  

"Many smokers believe they have tried and failed all treatments because they — and their physicians — have not used existing treatments in the most effective way," noted Nancy Rigotti, director of the Tobacco Research and Treatment Center of the Massachusetts General Hospital Department of Medicine. "Outdated product labeling by the Food and Drug Administration for nicotine replacement therapy contributes to this problem, as does the fear of possible side effects of FDA-approved medications. As a result, some smokers consider using newer, untested and unregulated products like electronic cigarettes."

In her paper, based on a grand rounds presentation at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Rigotti presents a hypothetical smoking patient: a 50-year old man who is discouraged because previous quit attempts — one with nicotine replacement, the other with the antidepressant bupropion — did not succeed. He is reluctant to try varenicline, another FDA-approved smoking cessation medication, because of concern about possible serious side effects. Feeling that he has "tried everything," he asks his physician whether he should consider electronic cigarettes.

Rigotti noted that many quit attempts fail because smokers do not use existing treatments or, like the smoker in the example, don’t use them in the most effective way. Only one-third of smokers who try to quit use behavioral support or medication — both of which have been proven to be effective. Even fewer smokers combine both types of assistance, even though this further improves a smoker’s chance of success.

Smokers who do use nicotine replacement therapy may not do so in the most effective way. Though many products are available — including over-the-counter patches, gums and lozenges, and prescription-only inhalers and nasal spray — many smokers only use one product when studies have shown that combining two is safe and more effective, Rigotti wrote. The patch provides steady, prolonged relief of nicotine withdrawal symptoms but cannot help with sudden cravings that may be triggered by environmental cues like watching someone light up. Shorter-acting products like gums or lozenges can help smokers handle those cravings. Despite evidence that combining NRT products is more effective than using single agents and support for combined therapy in the 2008 U.S. Public Health Service Clinical Practice Guideline, the labels currently approved by the FDA caution smokers not to combine different nicotine replacement products.

Some smokers may be discouraged from using two other FDA-approved smoking cessation drugs, bupropion and varenicline, because of reports of behavioral changes in patients taking those drugs, even though they double a smoker’s odds of success when making a quit attempt. Rigotti noted that in any individual it can be difficult to distinguish a side effect from the effects of nicotine withdrawal, which can include nervousness and depression. She stressed that both drugs are among the few effective options for treating tobacco dependence, and noted that physicians and patients need to weigh the potential risk of side effects against the certain risk of continuing to smoke. In most cases, Rigotti concluded, these drugs’ benefits would outweigh their risks, but she cautioned that physicians do need to monitor patients who start on these drugs for behavior changes.

"Tobacco use kills approximately half of regular smokers, and treatment for tobacco use is one of the most cost-effective actions that physicians and healthcare systems can take," Rigotti said. "Those of us who provide health care need to recognize tobacco dependence as the chronic condition that it is and give tobacco treatment as high a priority as we do other chronic diseases like diabetes or high blood pressure."

Rigotti’s work was supported by a grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.

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TobyGreenhorn says:
Jun-20-2013 04:57 am

I think whatever the regime is, if you do it religiously and with total commitment and discipline, you will definitely reap success. The same thing goes for smoking. If a smoker stays on a treatment plan and consume/use the medication accordingly, I am sure failure is not a common sight. However, as the article mentions, if a smoker is required to consume/use two medications simultaneously, then go ahead and commit to that before calling the treatment a failure. If all else still fails, green smoke is a good alternative, even though it has not been heavily regulated in many states and countries.

R.MURRAY says:
Oct-25-2012 02:26 pm

The author of this article is most correct. Dbutler also makes and excellent request. As a financial contributor to an e-cig company I can tell you that there have been and continue to be, several studies regarding the safety of the e-cig manufacturing process. Of course some are studies are performed by the individual companies themselves. There are private associations that have also conducted such studies as well. The information is out there, yet like any competitive industry, ie the cigarette companies, they do not wish to look at them. However with Lorrilard and other major cigarette companies now making and/or investigating the e-cig business it will not be long before the good ones prevail and statistical data will become available.

D.BUTLER says:
Oct-22-2012 11:00 am

I'd like DSN to do a report as to the safety of using electronic cigarettes. There doesn't seem to be much in the way of reports or studies on the topic.

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