HEALTH

Study: HbA1C test may not properly identify children with diabetes

BY Allison Cerra

NEW YORK — A test commonly used to identify patients with diabetes or those at risk of developing the condition may not produce accurate results among children, according to a new study conducted by researchers at the University of Michigan.

The study, published online ahead of print in the journal Diabetes Care, tested 254 overweight children using both fasting and nonfasting methods. Researchers found that the recommended test, hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C), missed more cases of prediabetes or diabetes, compared with other tests.

"We found that [HbA1C] is not as reliable a test for identifying children with diabetes or children at high risk for diabetes compared with other tests in children," said Joyce Lee, lead study author and a pediatric endocrinologist at U-M’s C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital. "In fact, it failed to diagnose 2-out-of-3 children participating in the study who truly did have diabetes."

Lee and colleagues said that an alternative testing method, a nonfasting one-hour glucose challenge test, may help better identify diabetes or prediabetes among youth.


Interested in this topic? Sign up for our weekly Retail Health Provider e-newsletter.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

HEALTH

CRN adds food and drug law policy expert to staff

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON — The Council for Responsible Nutrition on Monday announced that Rend Al-Mondhiry has joined CRN’s staff to serve as the trade association’s regulatory counsel.

“This is a new position for our association and [Al-Mondhiry’s] skill set and experience provide a perfect match for what we need," CRN president and CEO Steve Mister said. "Her knowledge of food and drug law will make her a tremendous asset for our staff and for our members."

Most recently, Al-Mondhiry worked as state legislative counsel for the Consumer Healthcare Products Association. In this role, Al-Mondhiry provided testimony and comments on legislative and regulatory proposals, drafted legislation and regulatory language and served as a policy expert in the area of food and drug law.

Prior to joining CHPA, Al-Mondhiry worked at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, serving as the director of state legislative and regulatory advocacy. She has also held legal internships at the Federal Communications Commission, the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission, and the Pennsylvania Office of Attorney General. Al-Mondhiry also has served at the state legislative level, working as an aide to Pennsylvania senator Jake Corman for two years, followed by a stint as the executive director of the Pennsylvania Senate Communications and Technology Committee.

Al-Mondhiry received her BA from the George Washington University. She earned her JD from Pennsylvania State University, Dickinson School of Law. She has been admitted to the Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Washington, D.C., Bars.


Interested in this topic? Sign up for our weekly Retail Health Provider e-newsletter.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

HEALTH

Valeant to buy iNova for up to A$700 million

BY Alaric DeArment

MISSISSAUGA, Ontario — Canadian drug maker Valeant Pharmaceuticals International is acquiring an Australian drug maker for up to A$700 million, Valeant said.

Valeant announced that it would acquire iNova, which sells and distributes prescription and OTC drugs in Australia, New Zealand, Southeast Asia and South Africa, from iNova’s current shareholders, Archer Capital, Ironbridge and others.

Valeant will pay iNova shareholders A$625 upfront and up to A$75 million in milestones.

 


Interested in this topic? Sign up for our weekly Retail Health Provider e-newsletter.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES