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Study finds misperceptions among adults, doctors about opioid dependence

BY Alaric DeArment

RICHMOND, Va. — Misperceptions and stereotypes about opioid dependence that may affect how it’s treated have persisted among the general public and physicians, despite increased attention devoted to the issue, according to a new survey.

Drug maker Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals, which makes Suboxone (buprenorphine and naloxone) sublingual film for treating patients with opioid addiction, commissioned Harris Interactive to poll more than 1,000 adults ages 26 years to 49 years and 200 doctors who have not been certified under the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000, finding that 47% of adults surveyed had a personal connection with addiction, while 12% had struggled with addiction.

According to the survey, 68% of adults and 87% of doctors agree that opioid dependence affects millions of Americans, and nearly all the doctors showed awareness that misuse and abuse of opioid painkillers put a significant burden on the healthcare system. But while 88% of doctors recognize addiction as a disease, 59% of adults said the same, and 45% of adults and 30% of doctors say opioid dependence is less of a psychological problem than a physical illness.

Stigmatization of opioid dependence may be hindering efforts to treat it, according to the study. More than three-quarters of adults and 93% of doctors mentioned shame and embarrassment, fear of discovery by others and fear of putting lives on hold as reasons why those with addiction might refrain from seeking treatment. But while opioid dependence affects people of all ages, genders, races and classes, 66% of doctors say low education make it more likely, while 57% said the same of low income. Only 27% of doctors believe any doctor can prescribe medication to treat someone with opioid dependence, and 31% of those who had not received DATA 2000 certification said they didn’t need it to treat opioid-dependent patients, while 7% said they preferred not to treat patients who have it, citing a difficult-to-treat patient population, large amounts of paper work and fears that their practices will be viewed as addiction-treatment centers.

"The stigma that unjustly exists towards those who suffer from opioid dependence could negatively impact or even prevent people from receiving the care they need," Yale University medical professor and American Society of Addiction Medicine fellow Mark Kraus said. "What is eye-opening about the survey is the realization that the treatment community has contributed to perpetuating it; there is a desperate need for doctors who are willing to treat opioid dependence as they would other chronic diseases."

Meanwhile, 56% of adults and 69% of doctors see relapse as inevitable, while only 35% of adults and 21% of doctors say staying at a rehabilitation clinic is effective, even though 67% of adults and 65% of doctors say opioid dependence can be cured, while 92% of adults and 98% of doctors say it’s treatable. Fifty-eight percent of adults and 73% of doctors strongly support the use of medication to treat opioid dependence, but only 44% of adults are aware that prescription drugs are a treatment option.

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J.KESSLER says:
Jun-14-2013 03:36 pm

My understanding, living in Maryland, is that there are a very limited number of doctors authorized to prescribe Suboxone and those few that are, are limited to x number of patients at a time. The last figure I received was 30 patients per practice. Next issue is the prescription cost of Suboxone sublingual. Rediculous. And most doctors will no longer prescribe generic bupinorphine, thanks to Suboxone. Additional to this problem is that Insurance companies classify this treatment as a mental disorder and not a medical disorder so many insurances will not cover the physician or the prescription expense. Other than Suboxone treatment, there is Methadone treatment. This is a nightmare for anyone, requiring daily trips to a clinic for dosing and once again, Insurance considers this a mental disorder and not a medical issue. The weekly cost of Methadone is between $70 - $110 per week and the clinic location can easily require additional daily gas expense. Methadone clinics are in it for the money by initially starting patients on a high dose and then rarely, if ever, recommending titration downward, unless of course the patient can no longer pay. Then the financial take-down is rapid and cruel. If a patient requests a dosage take-down program, they are usually met with a requirement to sign an against medical advice form in order for that dose reduction to occur. In conclusion, I just want you to understand that the so-called programs out there for opioid dependence are fundamentally flawed in the worst way and this is the primary reason for continued prescription and street drug abuse. People try in good faith and fail because the system does NOT work as it stands today. I strongly believe that Doctors and Insurance companies need to work together and the Government needs to get out of it altogether or this situation will continue to progress to further detriment of society and well-meaning people.

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Empowered Products launches new mass-friendly personal lubricants into intimacy health space

BY Michael Johnsen

LAS VEGAS — Empowered Products on Tuesday announced the successful introduction of its intimacy health personal lubricants Pink and GunOil into mass retail outlets.

 "I am proud of our small, independent company and our proprietary wellness formulas," stated Scott Fraser, president and CEO Empowered Products. "We are an active example of a consumer products company [who has been able] to successfully grow beyond its initial niche market into the mainstream consumer retail space." 

The personal lubricants are now available through more than 11,000 retail doors across major food, drug and mass outlets, the company noted.

 

 

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Convenient care clinics, NPs and PAs take center stage at RCEC 2013

BY Antoinette Alexander

The importance of convenient care clinics within the U.S. healthcare system, along with the nurse practitioners and physician assistants who work in them, rang loud and clear at the sixth annual Retail Clinician Education Congress held in May.

The three-day educational and networking forum, which is accredited for both nurse practitioners and physician assistants, was held May 14 to 16 at the Planet Hollywood Resort in Las Vegas. The Drug Store News Group, in conjunction with the Convenient Care Association and Partners in Healthcare Education, hosted the conference.

In addition to a track accredited for nurse practitioners and physician assistants, RCEC 2013 once again held the Executive and Health Systems Leadership Colloquium, a special executive track for management, upper management and C-level executives of retail clinic operators, as well as companies and organizations interested in entering the retail clinic industry.


A CEO/Leadership Panel offers attendees healthcare industry updates relevant to clinical practice.

New wrinkles in this year’s RCEC included a poster session program, which not only represented an important opportunity for healthcare providers to share research, programs and results with their peers, but it also increased the number of CE credits that clinicians could earn at RCEC. Attendees mingled with the authors to learn more about their poster presentations  during the Meet the Author events. The posters covered such topics as weight management and infectious diseases.

Marking its third year on the program, the CEO/Leadership Panel discussion offered attendees a first hand update from top clinic executives on critical healthcare changes, challenges and opportunities. A transcript of the CEO/Leadership Panel will be published in the next issue of DSN Collaborative Care.  

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