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Study finds improvements in cardiovascular health among South Asians who receive culturally relevant coaching

BY Alaric DeArment

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. — Culturally competent coaching may be effective in reducing the risk of coronary artery disease among South Asian patients, according to a new study presented as a poster at an American Heart Association conference taking place in New Orleans.

The study, conducted at the South Asian Heart Center at El Camino Hospital in Mountain View, Calif., and the Palo Alto Medical Foundation, examined 703 patients at the heart center who opted to enroll in the heart health coaching program. Of the patients, 145 were partially coached, 558 were fully coached and 33 did not participate.

The coaching was based on participants’ receptiveness to phone calls or emails from trained volunteers, who also provided culturally competent health education on diet, physical activity and stress reduction. Patients’ levels of cholesterol were measured after periods of not eating. The fully coached group showed significant improvements in cholesterol levels, while improvements also appeared in the partially coached group, and the non-coached group showed no significant differences.

"From a clinical standpoint, for every 1 mg decrease in [low-density lipoprotein cholesterol], there is a 2% decrease in that person’s risk of a cardiovascular event, which further emphasizes the importance of coaching," South Asian Heart Center founder and medical director Cesar Molina said. "Physicians have limited time to provide patients with this type of detailed follow-through, so coaching can prove to be an effective resource for them to achieve improved outcomes in their patients."

A secondary analysis of cholesterol levels and body mass index in 492 South Asian participants, nearly 22% of whom were women, showed improvements in both measures.

"Study results showed that even partial coaching could have health benefits for patients, as seen with improved total cholesterol and LDL levels," South Asian Heart Center executive director Ashish Mathur said. "Our heart health coaches are non-medically trained volunteers who monitor and motivate over phone and email, making this a cost-effective method for risk reduction in a vulnerable population."

 

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Network of Executive Women releases ‘2012 Annual Report’

BY Antoinette Alexander

CHICAGO — The Network of Executive Women, whose mission is to attract, retain and advance women in the retail and consumer products industry through education, leadership and business development, has unveiled its "2012 Annual Report."

The report opens with the personal stories of 10 network members, who explain how their engagement with NEW changed their companies, careers and lives. Among those features are Kim Tisdale, manager of expense payables at Wal-Mart Stores, and Chris Albi, VP merchandising at Kroger.

Additional highlights within the report include:

  • Membership grew 38% to nearly 7,000 in 2012;

  • Organizations represented grew 53% to more than 700;

  • Sponsors increased from 73 to 84, including 13 first-time sponsors;

  • National conference attendance grew 27%; and

  • 19 regions hosted 92 events, an increase of 37%.

To view the report click here.

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CVS Caremark, U.S. Sen. Reed take part in ‘March for Meals’ campaign

BY Antoinette Alexander

WOONSOCKET, R.I. — To help raise awareness of senior hunger in Rhode Island, CVS Caremark VP workforce strategies and chief diversity officer David Casey teamed up this week with U.S. Sen. Jack Reed, D-R.I., and Meals on Wheels of Rhode Island executive director Heather Amaral to deliver hot meals to homebound seniors in Cranston.


Meals on Wheels of Rhode Island client and Cranston resident Emilio Rao (sitting) receives a meal from CVS Caremark VP workforce strategies and chief diversity officer David Casey (standing on right) as part of the March for Meals event. Standing from left to right are U.S. Sen. Jack Reed, Rao’s daughter Lucille Pereschino, Meals on Wheels of Rhode Island executive director Heather Amaral, and Casey.

The deliveries by this group are a core part of Meals on Wheels of Rhode Island’s “March for Meals,” a month-long campaign created to draw attention to senior hunger and to encourage the local community to take action. CVS Caremark is premier sponsor of the campaign.

“March for Meals is an important program that will raise awareness about the need for seniors who are homebound or disabled — to have access to healthy and nutritious meals,” stated Eileen Howard Boone, SVP corporate communications and community relations for CVS Caremark. “This program aligns nicely with our company purpose of helping people on their path to better health by supporting our local seniors in need and addressing the issues they face on a daily basis.”

Sen. Reed’s involvement kicked off the congressional delegation support of March for Meals. His fellow members of Rhode Island’s congressional delegation will follow suit throughout the month, showing their support of the campaign by delivering meals to Rhode Island seniors in need.

Other sponsors and patrons of this campaign are presenting sponsor Webster Bank, AAA of Southern New England, Brown University Center for Gerontology and Healthcare Research, Cox Communications, Income Protection Partners, Johnson & Wales University, Mandel & Tracy; Partridge Snow & Hahn; The Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center at the University of Rhode Island, Starkweather & Shepley Insurance Brokerage; and Washington Trust.

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