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Study examines immune system’s response to sleep deprivation

BY Allison Cerra

DARIEN, Ill. — Sleep deprivation prompts an immediate response from the body’s immune system, according to a new study.

The "Diurnal Rhythms in Blood Cell Populations and the Effect of Acute Sleep Deprivation in Healthy Young Men" study — a collaborative effort between the department of forensic molecular biology at Erasmus MC University Medical Center Rotterdam and chronobiology, faculty of health and medical sciences at the University of Surrey in the United Kingdom — categorized and measured the white blood cells (known as granulocytes) from 15 young men.

During the first part of the study, the participants were placed on a strict schedule of eight hours of sleep every day for a week, were exposed to at least 15 minutes of outdoor light within the first 90 minutes of waking and were prohibited from using caffeine, alcohol or medication during the final three days. During the second part of the study, the participants were exposed to 29 hours of continued wakefulness. When comparing white blood cell counts in a normal sleep/wake cycle with white blood cell counts in a state of sleep deprivation, the researchers discovered that white blood cells showed a loss of day-night rhythmicity, as well as increased numbers, particularly at night.

"Future research will reveal the molecular mechanisms behind this immediate stress response and elucidate its role in the development of diseases associated with chronic sleep loss," said Katrin Ackermann, a postdoctoral researcher at the Eramus MC University Medical Center Rotterdam in the Netherlands and the study’s lead author. "If confirmed with more data, this will have implications for clinical practice and for professions associated with long-term sleep loss, such as rotating shift work. The granulocytes reacted immediately to the physical stress of sleep loss and directly mirrored the body’s stress response."


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Study: Caffeinated coffee could lower basal cell carcinoma risk

BY Allison Cerra

PHILADELPHIA — Increasing one’s caffeinated coffee intake could lower one’s risk of developing basal cell carcinoma — which is considered the most common form of skin cancer — according to a study published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Researchers led by Jiali Han — an associate professor at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School in Boston and Harvard School of Public Health — found that when conducting a prospective analysis of data from the Nurses’ Health Study — which included 112,897 participants in the analyses, 22,786 of which developed basal cell carcinoma during the more than 20 years of follow-up in the two studies — an inverse association was observed between all coffee consumption and risk of basal cell carcinoma. Additionally, an inverse association was seen between intake of caffeine from all dietary sources (i.e., coffee, tea, cola and chocolate) and risk of basal cell carcinoma. The researchers found, however, consumption of decaffeinated coffee was not associated with a decreased risk of basal cell carcinoma.

"Our data indicate that the more caffeinated coffee you consume, the lower your risk of developing basal cell carcinoma," Han said. "I would not recommend increasing your coffee intake based on these data alone. However, our results add basal cell carcinoma to a list of conditions for which risk is decreased with increasing coffee consumption. This list includes conditions with serious negative health consequences, such as Type 2 diabetes and Parkinson’s disease."


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TCCD International introduces Geodeo Natural Deodorant Plus

BY Antoinette Alexander

POMPANO BEACH, Fla. — TCCD International has announced the introduction of Geodeo Natural Deodorant Plus, which uses volcanic minerals and Icelandic algae to help fight impurities.

Geodeo has been specially formulated to be 97% natural, while also providing odor protection. Volcanic minerals and Icelandic algae work to help fight impurities. When applied to the underarm, these ingredients help to deeply purify pores from a multitude of environmental contaminants.

Unlike conventional deodorants and antiperspirants, Geodeo does not block pores and allows pores to excrete toxins naturally. The active enzymes in Geodeo help neutralize body odors instead of just masking them. The deodorant glides on clear to provide 24 hours of protection without the use of aluminum, parabens and silicone.

New packaging is a part of the Geodeo rollout. A majority of the product’s ingredients are natural and sustainable. Using imagery of waves and leaves, the labels evoke the sense that this deodorant comes from nature. Colors of pink, green and blue are used for an eye-grabbing effect, as well as to color-code the scents — pink for Island, green for unscented and blue for Ocean. A bold brown cap and bottle helps make the package stand out from other natural beauty products for easy brand recognition.

Geodeo retails for $5.99 and is available at Duane Reade, all Florida Whole Food Markets and online. It also is available at Walmart Canada stores.

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