PHARMACY

Study: Detecting diabetes among overweight children may require more than one test

BY Alaric DeArment

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — The blood test recommended for detecting Type 2 diabetes in overweight children may not be enough, and they may need two different tests to diagnose the disease, according to research conducted at Children’s Mercy Hospital and Clinics in Kansas City, Mo.

The researchers found that the hemoglobin A1C test missed more than two-thirds of diabetes cases in children at high risk for the condition, but they found that performing that test along with the oral glucose tolerance test dramatically could lower the risk of delayed diagnosis in overweight children.

The American Diabetes Test revised recommendations for diabetes screening last year, recommending the hemoglobin A1C test because it doesn’t require patients to avoid eating or drinking for a long time beforehand, while the oral glucose tolerance test previously had been considered the gold standard.

“Our research indicates that special consideration may need to be given to overweight children being tested for diabetes,” lead researcher Ghufran Babar said. “Simply following the guidelines may not be enough to ensure these children get proper care.”

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Greenstone launches authorized generic of Aromasin

BY Alaric DeArment

PEAPACK, N.J. — Greenstone has introduced an authorized generic treatment for breast cancer, the generics subsidiary of Pfizer said.

The company announced the launch of exemestane tablets, an authorized generic version of Pfizer’s Aromasin. Aromasin is used to treat early breast cancer in menopausal women who already have taken the drug tamoxifen for two to three years, as well as breast cancer in women whose disease has worsened while taking tamoxifen, which is widely available as a generic.

Authorized generics are branded drugs sold under their generic names at a reduced price.

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Novartis’ Afinitor approved as advanced pancreatic NET treatment

BY Alaric DeArment

EAST HANOVER, N.J. — The Food and Drug Administration has approved a drug made by Novartis as the first treatment for advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, Novartis said Thursday.

Novartis announced the approval of Afinitor (everolimus), saying it marked the first approval of a drug for advanced pancreatic NET in nearly 30 years. The drug already is approved for treating cancers of the kidneys and brain.

“The FDA approval of Afinitor represents an important step forward for patients with advanced pancreatic NET,” medicine professor James Yao of the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston said on behalf of Novartis. “Patients will now have access to a treatment that has been shown to significantly delay tumor growth and reduce the risk of disease progression.”

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