HEALTH

Study confirms safety, efficacy of OraMoist

BY Michael Johnsen

EUGENE, Ore. Quantum Health’s OraMoist, a time-released mucoadhesive patch that moistens and lubricates the mouth, was featured in the October 2010 issue of The Journal of the American Dental Association as part of a study that affirmed safety and efficacy of the over-the-counter product in relieving dry mouth.

The mucoadhesive patches tested in the study are available to consumers under the brand name OraMoist and are sold over-the-counter at such retailers as Rite Aid and Walgreens. Approximately 1 cm in diameter, the patches can adhere to any oral mucosal surface, such as the roof of the mouth or inside the cheek. The study confirmed the oral patch can yield a “statistically significant improvement in baseline subjective and objective measures of dry mouth for up to 60 minutes — and possibly longer — after application.”

 

“One of the results was that after two weeks of use of the patch, the amount of saliva in the mouth had increased even during times when there was no patch in the mouth,” stated the study’s lead author Ross Kerr, clinical associate professor at New York University College of Dentistry. “In other words, the patch would seem to have a cumulative beneficial effect.”

 

 

Chronic dry mouth is an under-diagnosed condition that can have a detrimental effect on oral health by contributing to tooth decay, gum disease and chronic bad breath, Quantum stated. The condition most often is a side effect of many prescription and OTC medications — 34% of people on three or more medications likely will have this condition. Dry mouth also can be a symptom of other medical conditions, such as diabetes or Sjogren’s syndrome, or can be the result of radiation treatment for head and neck cancer.

 

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Nearly $3 million for TB research awarded under FDA’s Critical Path Initiative

BY Alaric DeArment

SILVER SPRING, Md. The Food and Drug Administration has awarded almost $3 million for tuberculosis research, the agency said Monday.

The FDA said it awarded $2.9 million to six research products to help with the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of TB under its Critical Path Initiative. The disease has seen increasing prevalence around the world, and two recent articles by the agency’s Office of Critical Path programs noted that advances are needed to shorten therapy and treat drug-resistant forms of the disease.

The Critical Path Initiative was created in 2004 to drive innovation in the development, evaluation and manufacturing of medical products.

“FDA recognized an urgent need for the engagement and leadership of public health institutions to promote this critical, but neglected, area of medical therapeutics,” FDA commissioner Margaret Hamburg said.

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Advil makers encourage safe medication disposal

BY Michael Johnsen

MADISON, N.J. Pfizer Consumer Healthcare on Monday launched a consumer campaign encouraging Americans to clean out their medicine cabinets and properly dispose of unwanted, expired and recalled products.

Pfizer also is partnering with Suzy Cohen, author of “The 24-Hour Pharmacist,” to offer essential tips on medicine cabinet safety. “This campaign encourages people to take a few simple steps to help ensure the safety of everyone in their household,” Cohen said. “We all need to declutter and clean out our medicine cabinets.”

 

Arecent poll found that nearly half of Americans do not always look at the expiration date on over-the-counter medications before taking them, Pfizer noted. And to encourage consumers to do exactly that, Pfizer is providing a coupon for a free bottle of Advil to the first 500,000 eligible people who register.

 

 

Pfizer also is encouraging consumers to properly dispose of medicines, suggesting that when disposing of unwanted, expired or recalled products in the medicine cabinet, consumers should take precautions to ensure they protect children, pets and the environment from potentially negative effects. For example, no medicine should be disposed of by pouring into a sink, toilet or storm drain. The campaign directs consumers to consult their pharmacists on proper disposal practices, or to visit FDA.gov and search for “disposal.”

 

 

For consumers who wish to register for one of the 500,000 free bottles of Advil, Pfizer has established the website MedicineCabinetSafety.com.

 

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