HEALTH

Study: Blood markers may help determine Type 2 diabetes risk

BY Allison Cerra

DALLAS A new study published in Circulation Research, a journal of the American Heart Association, found that blood levels of some ribonucleic acids — known as microRNAs — vary among those with Type 2 diabetes or those who develop the disease, compared with healthy people.

 

MicroRNA comprises shorter molecular chains than so-called messenger RNA, which takes the genetic information contained within the DNA and allows it to be turned into proteins with various functions, and previously has been linked to numerous diseases, including diabetes.

 

Investigators analyzed microRNAs in blood samples of the Bruneck study — a large population-based survey of heart and other major diseases — and found that after analyzing initial blood-sample screens in 1995, 13 microRNAs found in diabetics had distinct differences than healthy controls’ blood samples. The scientists further analyzed these 13 microRNAs to identify the ones that showed the most variation between diabetics and healthy controls. Study participants underwent follow-up screening in 2000 and 2005. Of note, changes in five microRNAs occurred before the onset of Type 2 diabetes.

"We think that some of these microRNA changes may precede the onset of diabetes," said Manuel Mayr, corresponding author of the study. "Future studies will need to confirm whether these new markers can help to actually target therapies and assess patients."

The full study results can be accessed here.

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Abbott expands Ensure shakes line

BY Michael Johnsen

ABBOTT PARK, Ill. Abbott on Thursday introduced two new nutrition shakes — Ensure Muscle Health and Ensure Clinical Strength — both formulated to help rebuild muscle mass naturally lost with age.

Ensure Muscle Health shakes contain Abbott’s proprietary ingredient, Revigor, a source of HMB (beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate, an amino-acid metabolite), and 13 g of protein.

 

“Abbott scientists have been studying muscle loss for more than a decade,” stated Rob Miller, divisional VP global research and development and scientific affairs. “We’ve taken our expertise with HMB, the ingredient that has been clinically shown to support muscle mass and functionality in healthy, exercising adults, and have added it to one of our therapeutic nutrition products for people over 40 who are naturally losing muscle with age.”

 

Ensure Clinical Strength shakes offer focused clinical nutrition, coupling the benefits of Revigor and protein with Immune Balance, a unique blend of prebiotic fiber to support digestive tract health and antioxidants to support the immune system.

Clinical research has shown that beginning around 40 years of age, people can start to lose 8% of muscle mass per decade, which can lead to loss of strength and mobility. Weakness, fatigue, low energy and weight loss are signals of muscle loss.

 

In addition to two new innovative nutrition shakes, Abbott recently relaunched its product line and introduced a new, streamlined look for the Ensure brand. With an updated logo and packaging, it is easier for consumers to find the Ensure shake to fit their nutritional needs, whether it’s Ensure Muscle Health, Ensure Clinical Strength, Ensure Immune Health, Ensure Bone Health, Ensure or Ensure Plus.

 

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Milk drinkers maintain healthy weight, study finds

BY Allison Cerra

WASHINGTON Milk drinkers are more likely to lose weight than those who skip drinking milk when on a diet, a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggested.

In a two-year study, researchers observed 300 overweight or at-risk men and women ages 40 to 65 years. The participants were put on low-fat, Mediterranean or low-carb diets for two years, but regardless of diet, those that consumed 580 mg of milk per day (about two glasses), lost about 12 lbs., compared with those with the lowest dairy calcium intake (averaging about 150 mg, or about half of a glass), in which participants lost just 7 lbs.

Beyond calcium, the researchers also found that vitamin D levels independently affected weight loss success, and, in line with previous research, milk and milk products were the top contributors to vitamin D in the diets of the study participants.

The study, "Dairy calcium intake, serum vitamin D and successful weight loss," was published in the Sept. 1 edition of the journal.

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