BEAUTY CARE

Speed Stick seeks to protect clothes from stains

BY Antoinette Alexander

NEW YORK Colgate-Palmolive has introduced its new Speed Stick Stainguard and Lady Speed Stick Stainguard with Stain Defense technology to help fight yellow stains and residue on clothes.

“In a recent study, consumers said that yellow armpit stains continue to be an issue for them,” stated Philip Durocher, general manager of U.S. personal care for Colgate. “Our exciting new Stainguard line is specifically formulated to help with the yellow armpit staining issue that men and women face, and provides a unique way to address one of the largest unmet consumer needs in the category.”

The products are infused with patent-pending Stain Defense technology to help fight the appearance of yellow stains and white residue on clothes while providing 24-hour odor and wetness protection.

As part of the launch, Speed Stick has partnered with apparel brand Hanes. Special packs of Hanes Underwear T-shirts at selected retailers will, for a limited time, include a free trial of Speed Stick Stainguard.

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Poll: ‘Distasteful’ ads steer adults away from brand purchases

BY Michael Johnsen

NEW YORK Marketers beware. According to an Adweek Media/Harris Poll released Friday, more than one-third of Americans have chosen not to purchase a certain brand because they find the ads distasteful. Add the 22% who said while they have not yet boycotted a brand on account of advertising they have thought about it, and you have 57% of Americans who could be negatively swayed by bad advertising.

More than one quarter of Americans (28%) reported they had chosen to not purchase a brand because they did not like the spokesperson it used, while 22% said they have not done so, but thought of doing it.

When it comes to who is more likely to not purchase a certain brand because of subject matter or spokesperson, Adweek Media/Harris Poll found some differences among education- and income-based demographics. The more education a respondent had, the more likely they were to say they had not purchased something. Over 2-in-5 college graduates (43%) had not purchased a brand because they found the advertisements distasteful, compared with 29% of those with a high school education or less. One-third of college grads (33%) said they have not purchased a brand because they didn’t like the spokesperson, compared with 23% of those with a high school education or less.

And 25% of those with a household income of under $50,000 per year said they did not purchase a certain brand because they did not like the spokesperson used, compared with 28% of those with a household income of between $50,000 and $74,999 per year and 33% of those with a household income of $75,000 a year or more.

The Adweek Media/Harris Poll surveyed 2,194 U.S. adults online between Feb. 2 and 4.

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NPD: Prestige beauty sales drop

BY Antoinette Alexander

PORT WASHINGTON, N.Y. The economy took its toll on U.S. prestige beauty in 2009, but there were a few pockets of growth, such as skin care for sensitive skin, according to research by market research company the NPD Group.

According to NPD, total U.S. prestige beauty receded to $8.19 billion in 2009, a loss of 6% compared with 2008.

The overall industry decline, according to NPD, was primarily driven by fragrance. Total sales of fragrance were $2.48 billion in 2009, down 10% in both men’s and women’s. One segment that performed slightly better than the overall market: fragrance gift sets.

Also struggling during 2009 was the prestige skin care category, which posted its first year of declines, down 4% in dollars to $2.47 billion. While the category struggled overall, skin care was the only beauty category to see growth in the fourth quarter 2009, up 2% in dollars. The key driver to the quarter’s results was basic skin care, specifically products dedicated to sensitive skin, which saw positive growth — outperforming anti-aging growth for the first time.

Prestige makeup experienced its second year of declines, down 5% in dollars to $3.16 billion. The only two segments to outperform the category were gift sets (up 2%), fueled by new face-focused sets and the face segment (down 2%), which was driven by mineral-based products. This was aided in part by the fact that 50% more new mineral products were introduced in 2009.

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