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SoftSheen-Carson introduces new Dark and Lovely 6 Week Anti-Reversion cream serum

BY Antoinette Alexander

NEW YORK — Ethnic hair care brand SoftSheen-Carson has introduced its next major breakthrough in styling — the Dark and Lovely 6 Week Anti-Reversion cream serum.

According to SoftSheen-Carson, this marks the first styling product formulated to address the needs of relaxer consumers who desire to maintain the straight, smooth and silky look of just relaxed hair in between relaxing.

The New Dark and Lovely 6 Week Anti-Reversion cream serum features an exclusive humidity block technology, an amino complex that wraps each strand to seal in straightness and block out moisture. The 6 Week Anti-Reversion cream serum smoothes new growth, reduces use of daily heat, controls frizz and locks in shine. It is gentle and safe to use on color-treated hair.

How to use:

  1. Apply a quarter-size amount of product to freshly shampooed and conditioned hair;
  2. Blow dry after product application; then
  3. Flat iron and style as usual.

Use New Dark and Lovely 6 Week Anti-Reversion cream serum each time hair is shampooed and conditioned to keep hair smooth and straight in between relaxing.

The product is available in stores beginning in July and has a suggested retail price of $8.99.

Dark and Lovely also will introduce promotions in television, print and digital to support the 6 Week Anti-Reversion cream serum. Using the first virtual makeover tool, Modiface, consumers will have an opportunity to take the “Stay Smooth Challenge,” a call to action to encourage trial and review. Dark and Lovely also will participate in sampling opportunities throughout the year to promote the 6 Week Anti-Reversion cream serum among core consumers.

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Journalist Mark Halperin to keynote CRN annual meeting

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON — The Council for Responsible Nutrition on Tuesday announced that Mark Halperin, New York Times best-selling author and well-known senior political analyst for Time, will return as a featured speaker at The Conference, CRN’s annual symposium for the dietary supplement industry.

“We are delighted to welcome Mark Halperin back to The Conference,” stated Steve Mister, president and CEO of CRN. “Mark Halperin is this generation’s Bob Woodward, a shrewd investigative journalist with an ability to capture the most important moments in our political era. His speech at our 2010 annual conference was one of the highlights, and I know attendees will be looking forward to hearing from him again. He gave us a riveting account of the 2008 presidential election, and I, like so many others, am looking forward to getting his take on what is shaping up to be one of the most interesting political cycles in decades.”

As a featured speaker at The Conference, Halperin will share his insights on the upcoming race for the White House, the 2012 Congressional elections and how any shifts in power may affect the dietary supplement industry over the next few years. The 2008 presidential election was the focus of his popular book "Game Change." He currently is writing a follow-up book on the 2012 election and will share some of his stories from this new book with conference attendees.

The Conference takes place Oct. 3 to 6 at the Montage Laguna Beach in Laguna Beach, Calif.


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Researchers: Vitamin C RDA should be raised; pharmaceutical trials for vitamins faulty

BY Michael Johnsen

CORVALLIS, Ore. — Researchers argue there is compelling evidence that the recommended dietary allowance of vitamin C should be raised to 200 mg per day for adults, up from its current levels of 75 mg for women and 90 mg for men, in a recent report published in Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition.

The recommended dietary allowance of vitamin C is less than half what it should be, according to the researchers, because medical experts insist on evaluating vitamin C in the same way they do pharmaceutical drugs and reach faulty conclusions as a result.

“It’s time to bring some common sense to this issue, look at the totality of the scientific evidence and go beyond some clinical trials that are inherently flawed,” stated Balz Frei, professor and director of the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University. “Significant numbers of people in the [United States] and around the world are deficient in vitamin C, and there’s growing evidence that more of this vitamin could help prevent chronic disease,” Frei said. “The way clinical researchers study micronutrients right now, with the same type of so-called ‘phase three randomized placebo-controlled trials’ used to test pharmaceutical drugs, almost ensures they will find no beneficial effect. We need to get past that.”

Unlike testing the safety or function of a prescription drug, the researchers said, such trials are ill suited to demonstrate the disease prevention capabilities of substances that already are present in the human body and required for normal metabolism. Some benefits of micronutrients in lowering chronic disease risk also show up only after many years or even decades of optimal consumption of vitamin C — a factor often not captured in shorter-term clinical studies.

A wider body of metabolic, pharmacokinetic, laboratory and demographic studies suggest just the opposite, that higher levels of vitamin C could help reduce chronic diseases, including heart disease, stroke, cancer and the underlying issues that lead to them, such as high blood pressure, chronic inflammation, poor immune response and atherosclerosis.

“We believe solid research shows the RDA should be increased,” Frei said. “And the benefit-to-risk ratio is very high. A 200 mg intake of vitamin C on a daily basis poses absolutely no risk, but there is strong evidence it would provide multiple, substantial health benefits.”


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