BEAUTY CARE

Skin care brand Murad names CFO

BY Antoinette Alexander

EL SEGUNDO, Calif. — Skin care brand Murad — which was founded by Howard Murad, a board-certified dermatologist-trained pharmacist — has named Fred Gysi as CFO.

Gysi will report to Richard Murad, general manager. In this role, Gysi will be responsible for financial reporting, budgeting, treasury and cash flow management, financial and marketing analysis, and strategic planning.

Most recently, Gysi was the CFO for Canon Communications, a trade show and B2B publishing company. While at Canon, Gysi helped position the company for its sale to UBM, a U.K.-based conglomerate.

Murad products are sold in salons, spas and such retail locations as Sephora and Ulta Beauty.

 

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BEAUTY CARE

Simple skin care, AOL reveal next generation of ‘Makers’

BY Antoinette Alexander

NEW YORK — Unilever’s Simple facial skin care brand has teamed up with AOL to announce the winners of a nationwide search for extraordinary women driving positive change in their communities. The search is an extension of Makers, a multiplatform video experience that honors trailblazing women, including Sandra Day O’Connor, Hillary Clinton and Diane Von Furstenberg.

Recognized as Next Makers for their leadership, vision, courage and ingenuity, Col. Jill Chambers, Olivia Joy Stinson, Anna Rodriguez, Reshma Saujani, Emily May and Lydia Cincore-Templeton will join a group of groundbreakers that includes Supreme Court justices, secretaries of state, CEOs, athletes, activists and entertainers. Next Makers will have the opportunity to tell their stories in short videos at Makers.com. In addition, Simple will award each woman with a $10,000 grant.

“Simple facial skin care brand congratulates the Next Makers whose commitment, creativity and hard work are positively impacting our country, opening doors in their communities and inspiring change now and in the future,” stated Alison Clark, director of Unilever U.S. skin care. “Simple is proud to support the Makers initiative that celebrates women whose authenticity, ideals and pioneering spirit inspire others every day.”

Makers founder and executive producer Dyllan McGee, along with her filmmaking team, will meet with each Next Maker to capture her personal story. These videos will debut on Makers.com beginning Dec. 17, 2012.

About the Next Makers:

  • Col. Jill Chambers, Washington D.C.: Leading advocate for the military’s new nationwide strategy to address post-traumatic stress disorder;

  • Olivia Joy Stinson, North Carolina: Founder of PEN Pals Book Club and Support Group for Children of Incarcerated Parents, a nonprofit organization that she created at the age of 14;

  • Anna Rodriguez, Florida: Founder of the Florida Coalition Against Human Trafficking;

  • Reshma Saujani, New York: Founder and CEO of Girls Who Code, a nonprofit that empowers students from low-income communities to use technology to become entrepreneurs;

  • Emily May, New York: Founder and CEO of Hollaback, a nonprofit that harnesses the power of information technology to combat street harassment; and

  • Lydia Cincore-Templeton, California: CEO of Children Youth and Family Collaborative in Los Angeles, an organization devoted to improving the academic performance of foster youth.

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Beauty, personal care marketers have opportunity to target Latinas, study finds

BY Alaric DeArment

NEW YORK — Latinas prefer details in beauty products and follow a multi-pronged beauty regimen, according to a new study.

The study of 900 women by Siempre Mujer magazine, a Spanish-language publication that covers beauty, fashion and lifestyles for Latinas, found that 54% of Latinas are likely to seek and trust counsel from brand representatives at department stores, compared with 30% of women in the general population, while 50% of Latinas and 66% of Siempre Mujer readers feel it’s important that brand representatives behind the counter speak their language. Meanwhile, 45% of Latinas say celebrity endorsements are an important part of their purchase decisions.

"Latinas are not early adopters who shop everywhere; they are beauty junkies who do their research and want to know all the product details," Siempre Mujer editor-in-chief Maria Marrero said. "Beauty is a state of mind, a fabric of Hispanic culture."

The study, the second released by Meredith Hispanic Ventures, included Latinas, Siempre Mujer readers and non-Hispanic women. It indicated that Latinas outspend women in the general population, with more than 52% spending $25 or more per visit, while other women do so 41% of the time. Popular products include anti-aging, sun protection and fragrances, and 61% of Latinas and 70% of Siempre Mujer readers expressed a desire to try new products, compared with 55% of general population women.

"Marketers have a real opportunity to target Latinas across multiple subcategories of beauty," Meredith Hispanic Ventures VP and publisher Enedina Vega said. "This study clearly identifies actions they can take to develop a deeper connection with the Latina beauty consumer, particularly at retail and at point of purchase." 

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