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Shakira named global ambassador for 3D White collection

BY Antoinette Alexander

CINCINNATI — Procter & Gamble’s 3D White has inked its first ever global partnership with singer Shakira.

 “We are excited to announce Shakira as the exclusive global spokesperson for our 3D White property, around the world," stated Stephen Squire, global marketing director for P&G Oral Care. “As an award-winning recording artist, star of NBC’s ‘The Voice,’ philanthropist, beauty icon and mother, Shakira embodies the true spirit of the multi-dimensional woman, and always does it all with a brilliant smile on her face. We are thrilled to have a beautiful, strong woman of Shakira’s caliber to represent the brand.”

As the global brand ambassador, Shakira will help launch the latest additions to the Oral-B and Crest 3D White collection of products, appearing in the brands’ print and television advertising, public relations efforts and online properties. The campaign will kick-off globally in the fall of 2013.

“I am excited to be working with 3D White as a global ambassador — I have always felt that a smile is one of our most important assets in life,” stated Shakira. “They are an iconic brand and I know they will be a great partner, including the work we will be doing together to support children in Colombia through my Barefoot Foundation."
 


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H.BAUM says:
Jul-24-2013 03:01 pm

Her hips may swing but her lips are poisonous. She comes from Lebanon, is a Hesbollah supporter and anti-Semitic when she said like Morsi of the Islamic brotherhood that Jews descend from Pigs. Will the Jewish consumers support P & G or P I G? Shame on Proctor and Gamble for gambling on Shakira.

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Uniting healthcare communities with the clinical information exchange

BY Gene Boerger

Pharmacies are busily expanding into providing medical services, including providing basic healthcare screenings and immunization services. As a result, they are becoming healthcare providers, over and above their traditional roles. But just how well they are able to integrate within the healthcare continuum over the long term depends upon the strength of the bonds they are able to build with payers and medical providers … and those relationships are rooted in data connectivity.

Pharmacies will be glad to know that healthcare information exchange solutions are enabling a new level of information sharing that can help them more tightly connect healthcare communities, enabling seamless communications with health plans and providers, making them an integral component of the healthcare ecosystem. And driving this connectivity are new technologies such as clinical data repositories (CDRs) that are able to draw information from a wide variety of clinical and administrative sources and consolidate it in a single database, providing actionable information at the point of care.

This was evidenced in a recent CDR pilot project, which exhibited how clinicians could leverage the information to produce more through and accurate preemptive care plans and participate more effectively in patient population management. For example, with access to more complete regional demographic and patient mix statistics, participants also identified how the CDR could became a tool for provider-health plan negotiations.

And while the project didn’t include pharmacies specifically, it is not hard to extrapolate the benefits pharmacies could potentially achieve with access to a CDR, as well as the contributions they can make to collaborative care models. They will be especially empowered with accompanying analytical platforms that can assist in medication reconciliation and other pharmacy-enabled tasks. With information communicated via a user-friendly dashboard, pharmacists can have an important foundation for working with providers and payers, making decisions as to whether different drug therapies are necessary or whether a patient should receive a particular immunization.

With access to a complete set of data delivered via clinical exchange technologies, pharmacies—like their medical provider and health plan counterparts—can have a consistent view of patients, allowing them to collaborate on care delivery decisions. Pharmacists could identify gaps in patient medication therapies allowing for developing care plans with medication recommendations. They could also become a vital patient safety ally by performing medication reconciliation and assisting physicians in indentifying potentially damaging drug-to-drug or drug-to-allergy interactions.

While pharmacists have a long road ahead to integrate more fully with the broader medical community, they are capable of achieving a level of collaboration envisioned by accountable care and other value-based delivery and reimbursement models, making them a valuable future partner in the evolving healthcare marketplace.


Gene Boerger
Emdeon VP of product innovation
Gene Boerger, Emdeon Vice President of Product Innovation, has more than 25 years of healthcare industry experience. He specializes in technologies that assist healthcare stakeholders in becoming clinically and financially integrated for true care coordination.

 

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Study: Convenience a major factor for parents turning to retail clinics for pediatric care

BY Antoinette Alexander

NEW YORK — Many parents with established relationships with pediatricians are turning to retail-based health clinics when their children suffer from minor ailments largely because of convenience, according to research published this week in JAMA Pediatrics.

According to the study, 74% of parents first considered going to the pediatrician but chose a retail-based health clinic because it had more convenient hours (36.6%). This was followed by no available office appointment (25.2%), they did not want to bother the pediatrician after hours (15.4%), or they thought the problem was not serious enough (13.0%).

What is interesting to note is that, according to the study, nearly half of the visits occurred when the pediatricians’ offices were likely open.

Most commonly, visits were for acute upper respiratory tract illnesses (sore throat, 34.3%; ear infection, 26.2%; and colds or flu, 19.2%) and for physicals (13.1%).

The study was among 1,484 parents, and researchers found that 23.2% has used a retail-based health clinic for pediatric care.
 

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