HEALTH

Safe Heart introducing smartphone blood pressure monitor through crowdfunding

BY Michael Johnsen

 

 
 
ATLANTA — Having achieved earlier success through the Indiegogo launch of the iOximeter Smartphone Pulse Oximeter, Safe Heart recently launched a new crowdfunding campaign for Mobicuff, its new smartphone blood-pressure monitor. 
 
“The men and women receiving first diagnoses for hypertension grew up playing video games and are used to gaming elements in everyday life,” stated Yale Zhang, Safe Heart founder. “By making the previously tedious activity of measuring your blood pressure both fun and addictive, Mobicuff will move the needle and encourage positive lifestyle changes.”
 
“Built into the whole Mobicuff Ecosystem is this gamification, where there’s constant rewards, constant trophies and badges to keep you going,” said gamification expert Chris Klaus, founder of Kaneva. “It’s a real game-changer in the industry.”
 
Gamification elements added include trophies, rewards, unlockable features (such as The Mobicuff uploads to cloud and comparison with National Institutes of Heart averages) and an avatar called Mobie the Owl whose plumage and mood is dependant on how often the user measures.
 
The Mobicuff is a tethered hand pump blood pressure cuff for Android or iPhone. The campaign video, titled “More Frisky, Less Risky”, features a man pumping up the Mobicuff and checking to make sure his vital signs were good before engaging in bedroom activities with his wife. The technology was developed in partnership with researchers from the Oxford Centre for Affordable Healthcare Technology. 
 
Following the close of the Indiegogo Campaign, the Mobicuff is expected to be delivered in October of this year.
 

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Jackson, Miss. named Spring Allergy Capital by AAFA

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON – The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of American on Thursday released its top 100 list of Spring Allergy Capitals, naming Jackson, Miss. as the leading Allergy Capital in the U.S. based on higher than average pollen and higher than average medication usage. 
 
Nearby, Tennessee posted two cities in the top 10 – Memphis (No. 4) and Knoxville (No. 5). Knoxville, Tenn. climbed to the top-10 list from No. 16 last year. Other cities that reached top 10 status since last year include McAllen, Texas (from No. 10 to No. 6); Wichita, Kansas (No. 12 to No. 7); Dayton, Ohio (No. 11 to No. 8); and Providence, R.I. (No. 17 to No. 9). 
 
AAFA’s Spring Allergy Capitals report is an independent research project of AAFA and is sponsored by Dymista (azelastine hydrochloride and fluticasone propionate) Nasal Spray distributed by Meda Pharmaceuticals. “The Allergy Capitals can help to inform a pollen sufferer about geographical areas that may provoke and worsen their seasonal symptoms, which impacts
their quality of life,” stated Cliff Bassett, medical director of Allergy and Asthma Care of NY and an ambassador for AAFA. “It’s important that allergy sufferers take heed; a new study by AAFA revealed that spring is when most allergy patients experience their worst seasonal allergy symptoms."
 
The complete list is available at AAFA's website
 
 
 

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Ad Age: Kimberly Clark is bringing sex appeal to incontinence

BY Michael Johnsen

 

 

 
NEW YORK — The adult incontinence giant Kimberly Clark is shaking up what it means to have bladder leakage with its latest extension of its "Underwearness" campaign that focuses specifically on younger women, according to a report published Wednesday by Ad Age
 
Kimberly-Clark's marketing support fot its Depend products has been skewing younger for some time. Last year, Kimberly Clark launched its "Underwearness" campaign to raise awareness around bladder leakage, suffered by more than 65 million Americans, half of whom are under the age of 50.
 
"It's a recognition that many women with bladder leakage worry that people can tell," Liz Metz, brand director of Depend, told Ad Age. The ads, Metz said, are "recognition that one in three women deal with this issue, and they come in all shapes and sizes."
 
The report noted that the re-entry of Procter & Gamble into the adult incontinence space last year may be upping the ante for consumer attention. 
 

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