PHARMACY

RxWiki launches beta version of mobile pharmacy app

BY Alaric DeArment

AUSTIN, Texas — The makers of a new smartphone app say it will synchronize engagement between pharmacists and patients through mobile devices, social media, websites and printed media.

RxWiki announced Friday the beta release of Mobile+, a customizable mobile application that delivers medication information, news and alerts to patients’ smartphones. The app is currently available for Android devices and will soon be available for Apple devices.

"With millions of patients searching for health information on their smartphones, there is a major opportunity for pharmacists to connect with patients outside the pharmacy," RxWiki publisher and CEO Donald Hackett said. "RxWiki Mobile+ enables pharmacists to prescribe trusted information to patients on any digital device, at any time, wherever they are."

Features include integration of the pharmacy’s branding within the app, a touch-to-call option to dial the pharmacy’s telephone number and news feeds customizable by health condition.

According to Pew Internet research, 1-out-of-every-3 minutes spent online is on a smartphone, and research2guidance estimates that within two years, about 500 million people worldwide will be using healthcare mobile apps.

"The rapid adoption of mobile devices gives community pharmacists another opportunity to improve medication therapy management and reduce costs," Hackett said. "RxWiki’s Digital Pharmacist network members can ensure their patients receive trusted, consistent information throughout the medication delivery experience provided by RxWiki Mobile+."

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...
PHARMACY

Acadia Pharmaceuticals can apply for approval of Parkinson’s disease psychosis drug early

BY Alaric DeArment

SAN DIEGO — The Food and Drug Administration is granting an expedited application process to a company that has developed a treatment for a condition related to Parkinson’s disease, meaning that it can cancel a planned late-stage clinical trial, the company said.

Acadia Pharmaceuticals announced that the FDA had allowed it to move forward in applying for approval of the drug pimavanserin for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease psychosis, or PDP, based on data from an already complete phase-3 trial and other data. The decision by the FDA means the company no longer perform another phase-3 trial that it had planned.

"We are very pleased with the outcome of our meeting with the FDA, which we expect will reduce substantially both the time and cost of our PDP development program," Acadia CEO Uli Hacksell said. "This represents another important step toward our goal of bringing pimavanserin to the market as an innovative therapy for Parkinson’s patients who suffer from the psychosis frequently associated with this disease."

Of the 1 million people in the United States with Parkinson’s disease, about 60% develop PDP, a condition that causes visual hallucinations and delusions, according to the National Parkinson’s Foundation. There is currently no FDA-approved treatment for PDP, Acadia said.

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...
PHARMACY

FDA investigation finds widespread problems at compounding pharmacies

BY Alaric DeArment

SILVER SPRING, Md. — An inspection of more than two-dozen compounding pharmacies by Food and Drug Administration officials has found widespread problems with sanitation and sterilization practices, FDA commissioner Margaret Hamburg wrote in a blog post on the agency’s website Thursday.

The agency inspected 31 pharmacies that were known to have engaged in sterile compounding of sterile drugs. At all but one of the pharmacies, inspectors found problems such as mold and rust in clean rooms, black particles floating in supposedly sterile drugs, technicians using their bare hands to handle products that require latex gloves and wearing nonsterile lab coats. In at least two instances, FDA officials had to get administrative warrants to obtain access to pharmacies’ records, and U.S. Marshals had to accompany the agency’s investigators to one pharmacy.

In traditional pharmacy compounding, a pharmacist mixes drugs according to a physician’s prescription, usually oral solids, liquids, ointments and suppositories, which can be done from a pre-made kit or with an existing drug, such as the common practice of using capsules of Genentech’s Tamiflu (oseltamivir) to create a drinkable liquid formulation for children. But sterile compounding usually involves mixing drugs for injection, such as chemotherapy and biotech drugs, and it requires strict adherence to sterilization practices.

Hamburg has called for giving the FDA increased authority over compounding pharmacies in the wake of a nationwide outbreak of fungal meningitis linked to the New England Compounding Center of Framingham, Mass. An inspection by health officials of that pharmacy found widespread disregard for sterile practices as the pharmacy, according to officials, had effectively become a drug manufacturer.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the meningitis outbreak has sickened 733 and resulted in 53 deaths.

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...